Rewriting Caucasian History: The Medieval Armenian Adaptation of the Georgian Chronicles. The…

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byRobert W. Thomson

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After the invention of a national script, c.400 AD, Armenians rapidly developed their own literary forms, drawing on foreign texts as well as their own traditions. Historical writing is the most original genre in classical and medieval Armenian literature. Greek works (including the Chronicleof Eusebius, now lost in Greek but preserved in Armenian) constituted the major part of translated histories. But in the thirteenth century the extensice Chronicle of the Syrian Patriarch Michael and the first part of the Georgian chronicles were adapted for an Armenian readership. The collectionknown as the `Georgian Chronicles' was finally codified in the eighteenth century and represents only a small part of Georgian historical writing. The thirteenth century Armenian version is in fact the earliest attestation of this growing corpus of texts, predating all extant Georgian manuscripts ofit. This book presents the two texts, Georgian and Armenian, in English translation for the first time. The Introduction and Commentary draw attention to the ways in which the unknown Armenian translator changed his original material in a pro-Armenian fashion. His rendering became the standard sourcefor early Georgian history used by later Armenian historians. The book includes a useful overview of the background to the chronicles, the history and culture of Christian Georgia and Armenia, and their respective languages and literature.

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From Our Editors

After the invention of a national script c. AD 400, Armenians rapidly developed their own literary forms, drawing on foreign texts as well as their own traditions. Historical writing is the most original genre in classical and medieval Armenian literature. The collection known as the Georgian Chronicles ('Life of Georgia' in Georgian) ...

From the Publisher

After the invention of a national script, c.400 AD, Armenians rapidly developed their own literary forms, drawing on foreign texts as well as their own traditions. Historical writing is the most original genre in classical and medieval Armenian literature. Greek works (including the Chronicleof Eusebius, now lost in Greek but preserved...

From the Jacket

Its range of subject-matter includes language, literature, thought, history, and art: its geographical scope extends from the Mediterranean and Caucasus to East Asia.

Robert W. Thomson is a Calouste Gulbenkian Professor of Armenian Studies at University of Oxford.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:460 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.18 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198263732

ISBN - 13:9780198263739

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From Our Editors

After the invention of a national script c. AD 400, Armenians rapidly developed their own literary forms, drawing on foreign texts as well as their own traditions. Historical writing is the most original genre in classical and medieval Armenian literature. The collection known as the Georgian Chronicles ('Life of Georgia' in Georgian) was finally codified in the eighteenth century. It includes the most famous of the chronicles, though these form only a small part of Georgian historical writing. The thirteenth-century Armenian version is in fact the earliest attestation of this growing corpus of texts, pre-dating all extant Georgian manuscripts of it. This book presents the two texts, Georgian and Armenian, in English translation for the first time. The Introduction and Commentary draw attention to the ways in which the unknown Armenian translator changed his original material in a pro-Armenian fashion. His rendering became the standard source for early Georgian history used by later Armenian historians. The book includes a useful overview of the background to the

Editorial Reviews

`This is an excellent book, which I highly recommend ... this is the most fundamental work published to date ... This is the most precise translation available in any Western European language and as such will become the authoritative edition to which historians will refer ... In hisintroduction Thomson also provides a concise overview of both Georgian and Armenian history as well as their respective chronicle traditions. This acts as an admirably clear introduction to the history and culture of the Caucasus, which will aid all those unfamiliar with the region. Such a brief butup-to-date outline is not available elsewhere at the moment, which makes the work even more valuable.'Antony Eastmond, Bryn Mawr Classical Review