Rhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts by Rita CopelandRhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts by Rita Copeland

Rhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts

byRita Copeland, Rita Copeland

Paperback | April 28, 1995

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This is the first book to consider the rise of translation as part of a broader history of critical discourses from classical Rome to the late Middle Ages, and sheds light on its crucial role in the development of vernacular European culture.
Title:Rhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages: Academic Traditions and Vernacular TextsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:April 28, 1995Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521483654

ISBN - 13:9780521483650

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; List of abbreviations; Introduction; 1. Roman theories of translation: the fusion of grammar and rhetoric; 2. From antiquity to the Middle Ages I: the place of translation and the value of hermeneutics; 3. The rhetorical character of academic commentary; 4. Translation and interlingual commentary: Notker of St Gall and the Ovide moralisé; 5. Translation and intralingual reception: French and English traditions of Boethius' Consolatio; 6. From antiquity to the Middle Ages II: rhetorical invention as hermeneutical performance; 7. Translation as rhetorical invention: Chaucer and Gower; Afterword; Notes; Bibliography; Index of names and titles; General index.

Editorial Reviews

"...exciting to read....[Copeland] is clearly well-read in theory, and she plies the complicating analytical perspectives of recent theorists (especially Roman Jakobson's now-canonical metaphor/metonomy opposition and the hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer and Paul Ricoeur) with a good deal of suppleness....She is clearly a formidable authority on the traditions she explores....Ph.D. students in medieval studies, and generally anyone looking for research topics in the field, would do well to comb her book carefully, as she generates exciting avenues for scholarly exploration on every page....[M]edieval literature and criticism will be transformed by Rita Copeland." Douglas Robinson, Canadian Review of Comparative Literature