Rising Tide: Gender Equality and Cultural Change Around the World by Ronald InglehartRising Tide: Gender Equality and Cultural Change Around the World by Ronald Inglehart

Rising Tide: Gender Equality and Cultural Change Around the World

byRonald Inglehart, Pippa Norris

Paperback | April 14, 2003

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The twentieth century gave rise to profound changes in traditional sex roles. This study reveals how modernization has changed cultural attitudes towards gender equality and analyzes the political consequences. It systematically compares attitudes towards gender equality worldwide, comparing almost 70 nations, ranging from rich to poor, agrarian to postindustrial. This volume is essential reading to gain a better understanding of issues in comparative politics, public opinion, political behavior, development and sociology.
Title:Rising Tide: Gender Equality and Cultural Change Around the WorldFormat:PaperbackDimensions:244 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:April 14, 2003Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521529506

ISBN - 13:9780521529501

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Table of Contents

Part I. The Causes of the Rising Tide: 1. Introduction: Explaining the rising tide of gender equality; 2. From traditional roles towards gender equality; 3. Religion, secularization, and gender equality; Part II. The Consequences of the Rising Tide: 4. The gender gap in voting and public opinion; 5. Political activism; 6. Women as political leaders; 7. Conclusions: gender equality and cultural change.

Editorial Reviews

"Two leading political scientists have given us a clear, systematic, and powerfully documented book on gender equality...The result is a clear, coherent statement and rich detailed results. It stands as a baseline against which other interpretations may be compared...This work could become a classic."
-Terry Nichols Clark, University of Chicago, American Journal of Sociology