Romanticism, Revolution and Language: The Fate of the Word from Samuel Johnson to George Eliot by John BeerRomanticism, Revolution and Language: The Fate of the Word from Samuel Johnson to George Eliot by John Beer

Romanticism, Revolution and Language: The Fate of the Word from Samuel Johnson to George Eliot

byJohn Beer

Hardcover | May 11, 2009

not yet rated|write a review

Pricing and Purchase Info

$111.97

Earn 560 plum® points
HURRY, ONLY 1 LEFT!

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The repercussions of the French Revolution included erosion of many previously held certainties in Britain, as in the rest of Europe. Even the authority of language as a cornerstone of knowledge was called into question and the founding principles of intellectual disciplines challenged, as Romantic writers developed new ways of expressing their philosophy of the imagination and the human heart. This book traces the impact of revolution on language, from William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, to William Hazlitt, Jane Austen, Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot. A leading scholar in Romantic literature and theology, John Beer offers a persuasive new account of post-revolutionary continuities between the major Romantic writers and their Victorian successors.

Details & Specs

Title:Romanticism, Revolution and Language: The Fate of the Word from Samuel Johnson to George EliotFormat:HardcoverDimensions:244 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:May 11, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521897556

ISBN - 13:9780521897556

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Romanticism, Revolution and Language: The Fate of the Word from Samuel Johnson to George Eliot

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

1. 'Democracy' in Somerset and beyond; 2. Politics, sensibility and the adequacy of language; 3. The heart of Lyrical Ballads; 4. The Prelude: a poem in process; 5. Words or images? Blake's representation of history; 6. Blake, Coleridge, and 'The Riddle of the World'; 7. Challenges from the non-verbal and return to the word; 8. The nature of Hazlitt's taste; 9. Jane Austen's progress; 10. Languages of memory and passion: Tennyson, Gaskell and the Brontës; 11. George Eliot and the future of language; Index.