Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA by Brenda MaddoxRosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA by Brenda Maddox

Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA

byBrenda Maddox

Paperback | September 30, 2003

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In 1962, Maurice Wilkins, Francis Crick, and James Watson received the Nobel Prize, but it was Rosalind Franklin's data and photographs of DNA that led to their discovery.

Brenda Maddox tells a powerful story of a remarkably single-minded, forthright, and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century.

"A finely crafted biography." (Booklist)
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Title:Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNAFormat:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.94 inPublished:September 30, 2003Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0060985089

ISBN - 13:9780060985080

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great biography of a less renowned scientist I'd never heard of Rosalind Franklin before I picked this up at a used book store. It's a great read. Rosalind was one of very few women scientist, who did a lot of groundbreaking research, first on coal and coke (critical work in coal-dependent Britain, especially before WW2), X-ray crystallography (she took an X-ray photo, the first one to show DNA was indeed a double helix), and then tobacco mosaic virus. Her x-ray photo of the double helix, calculations and research notes were shared, without her knowledge or consent with Watson and Crick, who went on to get all the credit and the prize, without admitting or acknowledging her contribution until after her death from ovarian cancer at age 37. The book isn't too science-y, and the very complicated concepts are broken down in clear, easy to understand language; but it's not only about Rosalind's incredibly contributions to science, it's about her as a headstrong, complicated woman who had a fierce independent streak, love to travel, including mountain climbing, and her life in Paris and London around the time of the war. It is a fantastic read, highly recommended.
Date published: 2018-05-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great biography of a less renowned scientist I'd never heard of Rosalind Franklin before I picked this up at a used book store. It's a great read. Rosalind was one of very few women scientist, who did a lot of groundbreaking research, first on coal and coke (critical work in coal-dependent Britain, especially before WW2), X-ray crystallography (she took an X-ray photo, the first one to show DNA was indeed a double helix), and then tobacco mosaic virus. Her x-ray photo of the double helix, calculations and research notes were shared, without her knowledge or consent with Watson and Crick, who went on to get all the credit and the prize, without admitting or acknowledging her contribution until after her death from ovarian cancer at age 37. The book isn't too science-y, and the very complicated concepts are broken down in clear, easy to understand language; but it's not only about Rosalind's incredibly contributions to science, it's about her as a headstrong, complicated woman who had a fierce independent streak, love to travel, including mountain climbing, and her life in Paris and London around the time of the war. It is a fantastic read, highly recommended.
Date published: 2018-05-04

Editorial Reviews

“A vivid three-dimensional portrait of a sciencetist and human being … a moving biography.”