Rules of Civility: Large Print Edition

Paperback | August 7, 2012

byAmor Towles

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A New York Times bestseller, An Amazon.com Best Book of the Year -- An elegant and captivating debut novel, Rules of Civility tells the story of a watershed year in the life of an uncompromising twenty-five-year-old named Katey Kontent, a young woman with an uncommon sense of purpose. Armed with little more than a formidable intellect, a bracing wit, and her own brand of cool nerve, Katey Kontent embarks on a journey from a Wall Street secretarial pool through the upper echelons of 1938 New York City society.

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A New York Times bestseller, An Amazon.com Best Book of the Year -- An elegant and captivating debut novel, Rules of Civility tells the story of a watershed year in the life of an uncompromising twenty-five-year-old named Katey Kontent, a young woman with an uncommon sense of purpose. Armed with little more than a formidable intellect,...

Amor Towles grew up in Boston, Massachusetts. He graduated from Yale College and received an M.A. in English from Stanford University where he was a Scowcroft Fellow. His novel, "Rules of Civility" reached the bestseller lists of The New York Times, the Boston Globe and Los Angeles Times. The book was rated by The Wall Street Journal a...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:578 pages, 8.4 × 5.5 × 1.2 inPublished:August 7, 2012Publisher:Large Print PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1594135517

ISBN - 13:9781594135514

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Customer Reviews of Rules of Civility: Large Print Edition

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Fun Summer Read This novel was so much fun! It was a quick read with a drink in hand. It was stylish, elegant and unique, much like the characters. I enjoyed the story, though the real fun was in the writing style and vocabulary choices. New York City, 1930s, jazzy 20-something year olds. You must love art and silliness to enjoy this. Not a memorable read necessarily- nothing extraordinary or even that interesting, but very entertaining!
Date published: 2016-11-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Melancholic Overall this book is very melancholy. I find the atmosphere lonely and lacking connection. I don't cite that as a criticism just as explanation for how I felt reading it. Given the time period of the novel it fits. The book is mostly presented from the perspective of the protagonist Katie Kontent who comes across as ambitious but aimless. In fact a good deal of the characters in this book seem aimless and lost, chasing something they aren't even certain of. Sad and lonely and craving human connection. Reminiscent of a moment in which something occurs in life that brings to mind a friend you haven't thought of in a long time that you no longer see. It is similar to the tangent that your mind may take in remembering that person and the things you experienced together.
Date published: 2016-09-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Rules of Civility Rules of Civility perfectly encapsulates a time and a place - New York City between the two World Wars - a time of jazz, hope and opportunity. Two friend, Katey and Evey go out on New Years Eve in 1937 and chance to meet Tinker, a handsome young man in a $1,000 cashmere coat. The story takes place in 1938, told from Katey's perspective. Katey comes from modest means. She starts out in the steno pool and through drive, determination and taking advantage of opportunity works her way up to an editorial job and and a place in the rarefied circle of the New York wealthy. Evey comes from a well-to-do family in the mid-West but does not want to sit back and enjoy her family money on their terms. The three become fast friends but when Evey is injured in an accident where Tinker was the driver, he casts his lot with her. This book is beautifully written with smart, snappy dialogue and an intriguing plot. I was put in mind of the writings of F. Scott Fitzgerald. I would most certainly recommend this excellent novel.
Date published: 2016-08-29
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Slow A slow account of a womens life in new york starting in the 30s. Boring amd slightly depressing. Although a few decent takes on the quirks of life.
Date published: 2015-07-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Evocative and Engaging A great read set in New York City during the 1930s!
Date published: 2015-03-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Definitely Fun Read Loved this book! Well written and great time piece.
Date published: 2014-09-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful read I had to slow myself down with Amor's Towles book. It was so delicious in its language and imagery, that I needed time to let the story unfold slowly. Terrific narrative and I was completely immersed in the characters and timeline. I took some time to look up pictures of New York City in 1938 to give me better perspectives of the places and people. I highly recommend this novel. Well done!
Date published: 2014-07-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Wonderful read This novel was great at identifying and showcasing Prohibition-era America's obsession with wealth and high class. The romance wasn't bad, either.
Date published: 2014-01-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Rules of Civility One of those books that you think about between reading sessions and can't wait to return to.
Date published: 2014-01-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Elegant Writing Mr Towles writes in flowing sentences using beautiful language. That aspect of his novel is much appreciated. The plot is less interesting and often confusing. It is not a spell binder, but this period piece was, nonetheless, entertaining.
Date published: 2013-10-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Engaging historical read After seeing an old friend in a photographic exhibition about the 1930's, Katy reminisces about the man in the picture - Tinker Grey. Hr is as enigmatic as Jay Gatsby, with a mysterious past as well. Katy and her friend Eve vie for Tinker's affections until the events of one evening send the three friends on different paths. Where this will leads them kept me enthralled to the end. And the detailed portrayal of the time period and people living in it was spot on.
Date published: 2013-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! What a wonderful read! Definitely recommending it to all of you!
Date published: 2013-05-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great A good book! Makes you think about life...
Date published: 2013-01-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from In my top ten This was one of those books that I wish I could erase it from my mind so I could re-read it and have it be new to me all over again. I loved it. I dog-eared pages. I wrote down quotes from it. It's beautifully written and has become one of my all time favorites. Can't say a bad word about it.
Date published: 2013-01-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it Loved this book.
Date published: 2012-11-26
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not sure what the point of this book is? This book was written with such disorganization, that at times I wondered which character the author was referring to? The story rambled on and on for no particular reason. The most difficult thing to swallow was how the author skipped over the great depression in the heart of New York City. Slogged it out to the end, but I would never recommend it to anyone to read.
Date published: 2012-11-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Interesting premise, but hard to follow at times Katey Kontent is in her 20's, living in the 1930's of bustling New York City. Sharing a flat with her good friend Eve, they meet a charming ingenue named Tinker Grey at a jazz bar one evening. From the moment that this trio meet, it's a whirlwind friendship full of complicated feelings. Working in a law firm's secretarial pool, Katey has dreams to become more and her ambitions and growing network open up a world of possibilities. As she climbs the social (and career) ladder, Katey gets a taste of how things can be if you're successful, and how some things aren't always what they appear to be on the surface. The story begins many years down the road, as Katey is wandering an art gallery and spots her old friend Tinker in one of the art pieces. Thus begins a trip down memory lane, which was quite an adventurous journey. I had heard great things about this book, and with it being set in New York City with a female main character coming up in her own light, it definitely caught my interest. Unfortunately, it was a bit difficult for me to stay focused on. There was a lot of dialogue, and with the way conversations were formatted in the book (using dashes rather than quotation marks) I felt it a bit confusing to follow. At times, it took me a moment to realize it was still the same person that was talking, or it had switched to the narrative in the same line and actually no longer what was being said out loud. Not necessarily difficult to figure out, but it did make for a more disjointed read, not flowing as easily. I did feel that the three main characters, plus a few of the supporting cast, to be very strongly developed. There was often times that I really did wonder why Katey would be friends with someone as seemingly aloof and flaky as Eve. Whether that was the author's choice or a statement on the personality of Katey, I'm not sure. With a myriad of characters though, I felt it a bit confusing as to who was who, since some important characters were introduced so fleetingly and some that seemed to have a significant moment with Katey are then never to be mentioned again. There was one plot point in the last quarter of the book that I thought was headed towards a "The Help" moment, and there was some promise to that but was then dropped from the story. I wish that scene had happened earlier in the book, to allow for more development on it but perhaps the vision for this book was more about the web of characters, and Katey's career was just a subplot. Setting that aside however, I did enjoy the time and place that Rules of Civility was set in. The 1930's were a very distinctive period in time and seeing that through the eyes of a woman growing up in one of the busiest cities was quite interesting. The premise of the book is definitely what sticks with me more than the individual characters' lives. This, and other reviews can be found on JustALilLost.com
Date published: 2012-10-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Smart, terrific, charming This novel transports you totally to a different time and place. Beautifully written with rich, flowing language and interesting characters. Great entertainment all the way through.
Date published: 2012-09-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic book I enjoyed this book soo much! It is frank, the storyteller is a no nonsense kind of gal with a lot of courage. Loved it.
Date published: 2012-09-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Not to be missed! This book is awesome! I love the story! I love the characters! I love the time and music! This is not a love story by the way =)
Date published: 2012-08-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Must Read One of the best stories I've read in a long time, in large part due to the style of writing. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2012-08-08