Russian Cultural Studies: An Introduction

Paperback | July 1, 1998

EditorCatriona Kelly, David Shepherd

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Intended as a companion to Constructing Russian Culture in the Age of Revolution: 1881-1940 (also published by OUP) and covering a later period until the present day, this stimulating, original, and controversial book will not only be a vital resource for university courses on Russian cultureat undergraduate and postgraduate level but essential reading for all those interested in Russian culture in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods. In a wide-ranging account of a variety of cultural forms and sites of cultural production--literature, cinema, radio, television, the visual arts, journalism, advertising and consumerism, music, theatre, the Church--the book sets out to give greater prominence to the processes of culturalreception than in previous texts. The book highlights the role images of national identity, gender politics , youth culture and the interaction of public and private consciousness have played in the formation of cultural forms in the USSR and post-communist Russia. Drawing extensively butcritically on the theoretical agenda of contemporary cultural studies the book challenges the `top-down' model according to which cultural production is determined principally by its relationship to `high' politics and political institutions. Contributors include leading specialists in Russian literature, cultural history, and cultural theory from Britain, the USA, and Russia and the text is liberally illustrated with picture features and includes a chronology of events and suggestions for further reading with each section.

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From the Publisher

Intended as a companion to Constructing Russian Culture in the Age of Revolution: 1881-1940 (also published by OUP) and covering a later period until the present day, this stimulating, original, and controversial book will not only be a vital resource for university courses on Russian cultureat undergraduate and postgraduate level but ...

Catriona Kelly is Reader in Russian and Fellow at New College, Oxford David Shepherd is Professor of Russian and Director of the Bakhtin Centre at the University of Sheffield

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:442 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.87 inPublished:July 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198715110

ISBN - 13:9780198715115

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: Why Cultural Studies?PART I: The Politics of Literature2. `Revolutionary' Models for High Literature: Resisting Poetics3. Culture and Crisis: The Intelligentsia and Literature After 1953Suggested Further ReadingPART II: Theatre, Music, Visual Arts4. Performing Culture: Theatre5. Music in the Socialist State6. Soviet Music after the Death of Stalin: The Legacy of Shostakovich7. Building a New Reality: The Visual Arts, 1921-538. The Art of the Political PosterSuggested Further ReadingPART III: Cinema, Media, The Russian Consumer9. Cinema10. The Media as Social Engineer11. Creating a Consumer: Advertising and CommercialisationSuggested Further ReadingPART IV: Identities: Populism, Religion, Emigration12. The Retreat from Dogmatism: Populism Under Krushchev and Brezhnev13. Religion and Orthodoxy14. Russian Culture and Emigration, 1921-53Suggested Further ReadingPART V: Sexuality, Gender, Youth Culture15. Sexuality16. Gender Angst in Russian Society and Cinema in the Post-Stalin Era17. `The Future is Ours': Youth Culture in Russia, 1953 to the PresentSuggested Further ReadingConclusion: Towards Post-Soviet Pluralism? Postmodernism and BeyondChronology of Events from 1861Analytical Index of Names and PlacesSubject Index

Editorial Reviews

"A rich and fascinating account of Russian culture...which somehow manages to be as deep as it is broad." Graham Roberts, University of Surrey