Sabrina by Nick DrnasoSabrina by Nick Drnaso

Sabrina

byNick Drnaso

Hardcover | May 22, 2018

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THE FIRST EVER GRAPHIC NOVEL NOMINATED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE! LONGLISTED FOR THE CENTER FOR FICTION'S FIRST NOVEL PRIZE!"A profoundly American nightmare... The fictional killing in Sabrina is disturbing, but Drnaso doesn't fixate on the gore or the culprit; he's more concerned with how the public claims and consumes it, spinning out morbid fantasies with impunity... It's a shattering work of art." Ed Park, New York TimesConspiracy theories, breakdown, murder: Everything's gonna be all right - until it isn't.When Sabrina disappears, an airman in the U.S. Air Force is drawn into a web of suppositions, wild theories, and outright lies. He reports to work every night in a bare, sterile fortress that serves as no protection from a situation that threatens the sanity of Teddy, his childhood friend and the boyfriend of the missing woman. Sabrina's grieving sister, Sandra, struggles to fill her days as she waits in purgatory. After a videotape surfaces, we see devastation through a cinematic lens, as true tragedy is distorted when fringe thinkers and conspiracy theorists begin to interpret events to fit their own narratives.The follow-up to Nick Drnaso's Beverly, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Sabrina depicts a modern world devoid of personal interaction and responsibility, where relationships are stripped of intimacy through glowing computer screens. Presenting an indictment of our modern state, Drnaso contemplates the dangers of a fake-news climate. Timely and articulate, Sabrina leaves you gutted, searching for meaning in the aftermath of disaster.How many hours of sleep did you get last night? Rate your overall mood from 1 to 5, 1 being poor. Rate your stress level from 1 to 5, 5 being severe. Are you experiencing depression or thoughts of suicide? Is there anything in your personal life that is affecting your duty?

When Sabrina disappears, an airman in the U.S. Air Force is drawn into a web of suppositions, wild theories, and outright lies. He reports to work every night in a bare, sterile fortress that serves as no protection from a situation that threatens the sanity of Teddy, his childhood friend and the boyfriend of the missing woman. Sabrina?s grieving sister, Sandra, struggles to fill her days as she waits in purgatory. After a videotape surfaces, we see devastation shown through a cinematic lens, as true tragedy is distorted when fringe thinkers and conspiracy theorists begin to interpret events to fit their own narratives.

The follow-up to Nick Drnaso?s Beverly, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Sabrina depicts a modern world devoid of personal interaction and responsibility, where relationships are stripped of intimacy through glowing computer screens. Presenting an indictment of our modern state, Drnaso contemplates the dangers of a fake-news climate. Timely and articulate, Sabrina leaves you gutted, searching for meaning in the aftermath of disaster.
Nick Drnaso was born in 1989 in Palos Hills, Illinois. His debut graphic novel, Beverly, received the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Best Graphic Novel. He has contributed to several comics anthologies, self-published a handful of comics, been nominated for three Ignatz Awards, and coedited the second and third issues of Linework,...
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Title:SabrinaFormat:HardcoverDimensions:204 pages, 9.58 × 8.07 × 0.9 inPublished:May 22, 2018Publisher:Drawn & QuarterlyLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:177046316X

ISBN - 13:9781770463165

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Haunting graphic novel. I got this on the spur of the moment based on the praise it received by authors such as Zadie Smith. Except for Maus, I am not one who frequently reads graphic novels, so big fans of the genre may not find it as interesting as I did. It deals with a lot of uncomfortable issues, the kind that have been darkening our lives such the election of you know who. And I did have some trouble trying to follow the story at times (Who is he? Who spoke first here? Which frame came first?). But I devoured this work quickly and have been revisiting it frequently. I like it because it doesn't try to be hip, has a kind of French new wave cinema approach to the narrative, and, once you get into it, feels very alive and, frankly, gets the heart pounding. But it does take its time, so some readers may not find that a plus. I'm more than okay with that and am very glad I made this purchase.
Date published: 2018-08-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from An enigmatic and thoughtful read. It's refreshing to see a piece of literature tackle a subject such as this in such a thoughtful way without becoming preachy. The main themes behind Sabrina are that of loss and isolation within such a distrustful society; where media outlets and viable sources of news are becoming more and more alienated and thrown aside to only instead be replaced by self serving narratives and conspiracy theories being shoved our way through electronic devices. I have yet to encounter anything that portrays our age of "Fake News" so devastatingly honestly. It was so painful to read what happens to our characters within the simply drawn panels at times that I had to actually put it down a few instances to recoup my thoughts and to press on to the next few pages. My only gripe with the graphic novel was that I felt as though during some scenes it was difficult to physically distinguish one person from another due to the very nature of the flat colouring and simple illustrations of the characters. Despite that though I did thoroughly enjoy the simple but effective manner in which each panel was drawn, from the emotional expressions from each character to the environments and seasons of the world they inhabit. Nick Drnaso has done a fantastic job creating such an uncomfortable lens positioned at our society at the present moment; it will be difficult not to carry this feeling with me for years to come.
Date published: 2018-07-27

Editorial Reviews

"Drnaso?s diagnosis of the sickness at the soul of sheltered communities is novel in its discordant effects and keen observation." ? The Globe and Mail

"Uncomfortable, fascinating . . . Full of moments in which the bubbling reservoir of anxiety or feeling or darkness boils to the surface." ? Slate