Sanchos Journal: Exploring the Political Edge with the Brown Berets

Paperback | November 15, 2012

byDavid Montejano

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How do people acquire political consciousness, and how does that consciousness transform their behavior? This question launched the scholarly career of David Montejano, whose masterful explorations of the Mexican American experience produced the award-winning books Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836–1986, a sweeping outline of the changing relations between the two peoples, and Quixote's Soldiers: A Local History of the Chicano Movement, 1966–1981, a concentrated look at how a social movement "from below" began to sweep away the last vestiges of the segregated social-political order in San Antonio and South Texas. Now in Sancho's Journal, Montejano revisits the experience that set him on his scholarly quest—"hanging out" as a participant-observer with the South Side Berets of San Antonio as the chapter formed in 1974.

Sancho's Journal presents a rich ethnography of daily life among the "batos locos" (crazy guys) as they joined the Brown Berets and became associated with the greater Chicano movement. Montejano describes the motivations that brought young men into the group and shows how they learned to link their individual troubles with the larger issues of social inequality and discrimination that the movement sought to redress. He also recounts his own journey as a scholar who came to realize that, before he could tell this street-level story, he had to understand the larger history of Mexican Americans and their struggle for a place in U.S. society. Sancho's Journal completes that epic story.

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How do people acquire political consciousness, and how does that consciousness transform their behavior? This question launched the scholarly career of David Montejano, whose masterful explorations of the Mexican American experience produced the award-winning books Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836–1986, a sweeping outli...

David Montejano is Professor of Ethnic Studies and History at the University of California, Berkeley. His fields of specialization include community studies, historical and political sociology, and race and ethnic relations. In addition to his books Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836–1986 and Quixote’s Soldiers, he is the...

other books by David Montejano

Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836-1986
Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836-1986

Kobo ebook|Jul 5 2010

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:219 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:November 15, 2012Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:029274384X

ISBN - 13:9780292743847

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Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments1. On Slow Writing2. Regeneración3. Por La Causa4. Somos Camaradas5. A Dallas Vamos6. Negotiating Locura7. No Somos Comunistas8. What We Do to Live!9. From the Island Kingdoms10. And the Political Edge?11. Many Years LaterBibliographic Notes

Editorial Reviews

Montejano’s splendid narrative ethnography chronicles his experience, some thirty years ago, as a participant-observer of San Antonio’s Westside Brown Berets. He hypothesized a transformation among the Berets from barrio youth to political subjects. Instead he found the group’s activities more often improvised than planned. Indeed the Southside Berets maintained their former street gang activities and forms of organization. This remarkable book provides a surprising and intimate portrait of how militant Chicanos lived a period of intense political change. - Renato I. Rosaldo, Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences; Professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis; Director of Latino Studies, Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University