Sanctions As Economic Statecraft: Theory and Practice

Hardcover | October 6, 2000

EditorSteve Chan

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Economic sanctions have become an increasingly popular instrument of foreign policy. They have been used with increasing incidence to discourage or punish a variety of objectionable practices--such as terrorism, ethnic cleansing, nuclear proliferation, human rights abuses--by states and multilateral organizations such as the UN and NATO. Yet much controversy characterizes the debate about both the motivations behind the initiation of economic sanctions and the consequences following from their imposition. This collection of essays seeks to illuminate this debate through a combination of different methodologies and cases.

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Economic sanctions have become an increasingly popular instrument of foreign policy. They have been used with increasing incidence to discourage or punish a variety of objectionable practices--such as terrorism, ethnic cleansing, nuclear proliferation, human rights abuses--by states and multilateral organizations such as the UN and NAT...

Steve Chan is Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Colorado. A. Cooper Drury is Tower Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor, the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, Department of Political Science, Southern Methodist University, Dallas Texas.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 8.9 × 5.54 × 0.85 inPublished:October 6, 2000Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0312231970

ISBN - 13:9780312231972

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Table of Contents

Sanctions as Economic Statecraft: An Overview--Steve Chan & A. Cooper Drury * A Century of Economic Sanctions: A Field Revisited--Peter Wallensteen * How and Whom the US President Sanctions: A Time-Series, Cross Section Analysis of US Sanctions Decisions and Characteristics--A. Cooper Drury * Who's Afraid of Economic Incentives? The Efficacy-Externality Tradeoff--Jason Davidson & George Shambaugh * Economic Sanctions: The Cuba Embargo Revisited--Daniel W. Fisk * The US-North Korean Agreed Framework: Incentives-Based Diplomacy after the Cold War--Curtis H. Martin * The US Debate on MFN Status for China--Steve Chan * Economic Sanctions, Domestic Politics and the Decline of Rhodesian Tobacco, 1965-1979--David M. Rowe * A Public Choice Analysis of the Political Economy of International Sanctions--William H. Kaempfer & Anton D. Lowenberg * Sanctions as Signals: A Line in the Sand or a Lack of Resolve?--Valerie Schwebach * The Complex Causation of Sanction Outcomes--Daniel W. Drezzner

Editorial Reviews

It makes a real contribution to the study of economic statecraft and should be of interest to a broad range of readers. International Politics