Saving the Reservation: Joe Garry and the Battle to Be Indian

Paperback | August 13, 2015

byJohn Fahey

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Joseph R. Garry (1910-1975), a Coeur d'Alene Indian, served six terms as president of the National Congress of American Indians in the 1950s. He led the battles to compel the federal government to honor treaties and landownership and dominated an era in government-Indian relations little attended by historians. Firmly believing that forced assimilation of Indians and termination of federal trusteeship over Native Americans and their reservations would doom Indian cultures, Garry had his greatest success as a leader in uniting American Indian tribes to fend off Congress's plan to abandon Indian citizens.

Born into a chief's family and raised on the Coeur d'Alene reservation in northern Idaho, Garry rose to chairmanship of his tribal council, president of the Affiliated Tribes of the Northwest Indians, and leadership of NCAI. He was the first Native American elected to the Idaho House and Senate.

Handsome, personable, and articulate, Garry traveled constantly to urge Indian tribes to hold onto their land, develop economic resources, and educate their young. In a turbulent decade, Garry elevated Indians to political and social participation in American life, and set in motion forces that underlie Indian relations today.

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Joseph R. Garry (1910-1975), a Coeur d'Alene Indian, served six terms as president of the National Congress of American Indians in the 1950s. He led the battles to compel the federal government to honor treaties and landownership and dominated an era in government-Indian relations little attended by historians. Firmly believing that fo...

John Fahey is professor emeritus of radio-television and history at Eastern Washington University, Cheney and Spokane.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.51 inPublished:August 13, 2015Publisher:University of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295995378

ISBN - 13:9780295995373

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Table of Contents

Contents

PrefaceEmergency!"The Chance of our Indian Lifetimes"The Crucial YearTurning PointsRoots: The Coeur d'AlenesBoy to ManToward a Victory of SortsThe Garry Era EndsMoney--and Its Consequences"I Enjoyed Working with the People"EpilogueNotes Sources Index

Editorial Reviews

Joseph R. Garry (1910-1975), a Coeur d'Alene Indian, served six terms as president of the National Congress of American Indians in the 1950s. He led the battles to compel the federal government to honor treaties and landownership and dominated an era in government-Indian relations little attended by historians. Firmly believing that forced assimilation of Indians and termination of federal trusteeship over Native Americans and their reservations would doom Indian cultures, Garry had his greatest success as a leader in uniting American Indian tribes to fend off Congress's plan to abandon Indian citizens.Born into a chief's family and raised on the Coeur d'Alene reservation in northern Idaho, Garry rose to chairmanship of his tribal council, president of the Affiliated Tribes of the Northwest Indians, and leadership of NCAI. He was the first Native American elected to the Idaho House and Senate.Handsome, personable, and articulate, Garry traveled constantly to urge Indian tribes to hold onto their land, develop economic resources, and educate their young. In a turbulent decade, Garry elevated Indians to political and social participation in American life, and set in motion forces that underlie Indian relations today.No one will forget Joe Garry after reading this, nor will anyone traveling across any reservation forget the legacy of a handful of paper warriors like Garry, Helen Peterson, Archie Phinney, and D'Arcy McNickle, who saved Indian lands and pressed for self-determination, armed with briefcases, petitions, and typewriters, at a time when Washington, D.C.. launched open war on Indian culture itself, hoping to terminate its trust and treaty responsibilities in the interest of economy and assimilation. - William R. Swagerty, University of Idaho