Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 6, Military Technology: Missiles and Sieges by Joseph NeedhamScience and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 6, Military Technology: Missiles and Sieges by Joseph Needham

Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 6, Military…

byJoseph Needham, Robin D. S. Yates

Hardcover | March 31, 1995

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Science and Civilisation in China Volume V Part 6 is the first of the three parts dealing with the arts of war in ancient and medieval China. (Part 7--on gunpowder and all aspects of explosive weapons--has already been published, while Part 8--on cavalry techniques and signaling--is still in preparation.) The present volume opens with an introduction on Chinese attitudes to warfare in general. Four major sections follow: on the making and use of simple bows; on the crossbow, the standard weapon of the Han armies, and its introduction to the Western world; on the pre-gunpowder forms of artillery, including the invention of the trebuchet; and on the art of siege warfare in which the Mohists were particularly interested. There is a good deal of material on siege-warfare available, and this final section is a substantial one, covering all aspects in detail.
Title:Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 6, Military…Format:HardcoverDimensions:620 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 1.69 inPublished:March 31, 1995Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052132727X

ISBN - 13:9780521327275

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Table of Contents

Part I. Military Technology: (a) Introduction; (b) Chinese Literature on the Art of War Krysztof Gawlikowski; 1. The military theoreticians; 2. The military encyclopaedists; 3. Basic concepts of the classical Chinese theory of war; general principles of action; 4. Combat and competition; 5. Other components of the classical Chinese theory of war; 6. The main controversies within Chinese military thought; (c) Distinctive Features of Chinese Military Thought: 1. Reasons for its perennial vitality; 2. A syncretistic tradition; the non-military approach to war and the duties of soldiers; 3. The great popularity of military thought among the people; 4. Military thought in civil life; 5. The place of the military element (wu) in the Chinese world order; (d) Projectile Weapons: I. Archery (with Edward McEwen): 1. The bow; 2. The crossbow; 3. The social role of the bow and crossbow; Part II. Ballistic Machinery: (with Wang Ling); 4. Spring, sinew, sling and swape; definitions and distribution; 5. Forms of the arcuballista; 6. Trebuchets, manned and counterweighted; 7. Distribution and diffusion; (e) Early Poliorcetics: the Mohists to the Sung Robin D. S. Yates: 1. Early cities; 2. The twelve types of attack; Bibliographies.

From Our Editors

'The width of his view, the range of his reading, and the penetration of his mind compel the utmost respect for his treatment and his conclusions. It is a book which is bound to modify all subsequent histories of Chinese thought and indeed the histories of thought the world around.' - L. Carrington Goodrich in Far Eastern Survey (New York).

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"Perhaps the greatest single act of historical synthesis and intercultural communication ever attempted by one man."
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