Science, Reading, and Renaissance Literature: The Art of Making Knowledge, 1580-1670 by Elizabeth SpillerScience, Reading, and Renaissance Literature: The Art of Making Knowledge, 1580-1670 by Elizabeth Spiller

Science, Reading, and Renaissance Literature: The Art of Making Knowledge, 1580-1670

byElizabeth Spiller

Paperback | July 12, 2007

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This monograph documents the development of two cultures and disciplines: science and literature--through a shared aesthetic of knowledge. It brings together key works in early modern science and imaginative literature, ranging from the anatomy of William Harvey and the experimentalism of William Gilbert to the fiction of Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser and Margaret Cavendish.

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Title:Science, Reading, and Renaissance Literature: The Art of Making Knowledge, 1580-1670Format:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:July 12, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521037689

ISBN - 13:9780521037686

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Table of Contents

List of figures; Acknowledgements; Introduction: making early modern science and literature; 1. Model worlds: Philip Sidney, William Gilbert and the experiment of worldmaking; 2. From embryology to parthenogenesis: the birth of the writer in Edmund Spenser and William Harvey; 3. Reading through Galileo's telescope: Johannes Kepler's dream for reading knowledge; 4. Books written of the wonders of these glasses: Thomas Hobbes, Robert Hooke and Margaret Cavendish's theory of reading; Afterword: fiction and the Sokal hoax; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Science, Reading, and Renaissance Literature is a smart and engaging contribution to our production of knowledge" The Spenser Review Mary Floyd-Wilson