Sciences and the Self in Medieval Poetry: Alan of Lilles Anticlaudianus and John Gowers Confessio Amantis by James SimpsonSciences and the Self in Medieval Poetry: Alan of Lilles Anticlaudianus and John Gowers Confessio Amantis by James Simpson

Sciences and the Self in Medieval Poetry: Alan of Lilles Anticlaudianus and John Gowers Confessio…

byJames SimpsonEditorAlastair Minnis, Patrick Boyde

Paperback | October 13, 2005

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This study examines two great poems of the later medieval period, the Latin philosophical epic, Alan of Lille's Anticlaudianus (1181-3), and John Gower's English poem, the Confessio Amantis (1390-3). James Simpson locates these works in a cultural context dominated by two kinds of literary humanism, in which the concept of self is centered in the intellect and the imagination respectively, and shows the very different modes of thought that lie behind their conceptions of selfhood and education.
Title:Sciences and the Self in Medieval Poetry: Alan of Lilles Anticlaudianus and John Gowers Confessio…Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:October 13, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021111

ISBN - 13:9780521021111

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. The outer form of the Anticlaudianus; 3. A preposterous interpretation of the Anticlaudianus; 4. Alan's philosopher-king; 5. Ovidian disunity in Gower's Confessio Amantis; 6. Genius's psychological information in Book III; 7. The primacy of politics in the Confessio Amantis; 8. Poetics; 9. Conclusion: varieties of humanist politics.

Editorial Reviews

"Sciences and the Seld in Medieva Poetry is unquestionably an importnat book, a necessary book, for anyone who takes either Alan or Gower seriously. Its influence on studies of the Anticlaudianus, the Confessio, and its place in the ongoing conversation about high medieval humanism, will be significant. Simpson shows his mettle here as a scholar of the very best kind-vigorous, contrarian, and wise." R.F. Yeager, Modern Philology