Scottish Puritanism, 1590-1638

Hardcover | July 1, 2000

byDavid George Mullan

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Scottish Puritanism, 1590-1638, is a portrait of Protestantism in the two generations leading to the National Covenant of 1638. This book investigates the construction of a puritan community embracing 'godly' ministers along with significant numbers of lay men and women willing to engage inthe practice of a piety which confronted the inner person and the external world, seeking the reformation of both. Topics include attitudes towards the Bible and the sacraments, the nature of the Christian life, the place of the feminine in Scottish divinity, and the development of ideas aboutpredestination, covenanting, and the relationship between church and state. The book addresses the tensions inherent in puritanism, such as those associated with the nature of the church and the extent of freedom, and provides a perspective on the relationship between Scottish and English religiousdevelopments.

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Scottish Puritanism, 1590-1638, is a portrait of Protestantism in the two generations leading to the National Covenant of 1638. This book investigates the construction of a puritan community embracing 'godly' ministers along with significant numbers of lay men and women willing to engage inthe practice of a piety which confronted the i...

David George Mullan is an Associate Professor, History and Religious Studies at University College of Cape Breton.

other books by David George Mullan

Format:HardcoverPublished:July 1, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198269978

ISBN - 13:9780198269977

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`Significant comparisons arise in the text about English and Scottish religious developments.'Northern History, XXXVIII