Segregation and Apartheid in Twentieth Century South Africa by William BeinartSegregation and Apartheid in Twentieth Century South Africa by William Beinart

Segregation and Apartheid in Twentieth Century South Africa

EditorWilliam Beinart, Saul Dubow

Paperback | April 13, 1995

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As South Africa moves towards majority rule, and blacks begin to exercise direct political power, apartheid becomes a thing of the past - but its legacy in South African history will be indelible. this book is designed to introduce students to a range of interpretations of one of South Africa's central social characteristics: racial segregation. It:

• brings together eleven articles which span the whole history of segregation from its origins to its final collapse
• reviews the new historiography of segregation and the wide variety of intellectual traditions on which it is based
• includes a glossary, explanatory notes and further reading.

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Title:Segregation and Apartheid in Twentieth Century South AfricaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.8 inPublished:April 13, 1995Publisher:Taylor and Francis

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415103576

ISBN - 13:9780415103572

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"An outstanding collection, a kind of gathering of the harvest of 20 years of intense scholarly and political debate. The book will be required reading for anyone interested in the political and intellectual origins of apartheid."-Jim Campbell, Northwestern University "A most welcome reader for those wishing to follow the historical literature of the subject. It includes many of the key writings which influenced subsequent research and will continue to have an impact upon the way we look at the past."-A. J. Christopher, University of Port Elizabeth