Selections Illustrating Economic History Since The Seven Years' War

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byBenjamin Anonymous

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...coarsest and most prolific kind, called lumpers or horse potatoes. Nor was it the food of the people only in Ireland. Pigs and poultry shared the potatoes with the peasant's family, and often became the inmates of his cabin also. One great evil connected with potato culture is, that whilst the crop is precarious and uncertain, it cannot be stored up. The surplus of one abundant year is quite unfit to use in the next, and owing to its great bulk it cannot even be transported from place to place. Moreover, once used to a description of food so extremely cheap, no retrenchment is possible, and when blight comes and the crop is destroyed the people seem doomed to absolute starvation. This, unfortunately, was the case in 1822 and 1831. In those years public subscriptions were got up, king's letters issued, balls and bazaars held, and public money granted. But in 1845 and 1846 the calamity was greater than any previously experienced. 1 9 and 10 Viet. c. 21, suspended by 10 and 1 1 Viet. c. I. The potato disease first manifested itself in 1845. The early crop, dug in September and October, which consists of one-sixth of the whole, nearly escaped; but the whole of the late crop, the people's crop, dug in December and January, was tainted before arriving at maturity. In that year there was a full average crop of wheat. Oats and barley were abundant, and turnips, carrots, and greens, including hay, were sufficient. Yet on the continent the rye crop failed, and the potato disease appeared in Belgium, Holland, France, and the west of Germany. On the whole the supply of grain was fair during the year 1845, and prices ruled moderately high. In 1846, however, blight attacked the potatoes with even greater fury and suddenness in the month of July, and it...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...coarsest and most prolific kind, called lumpers or horse potatoes. Nor was it the food of the people only in Ir...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:142 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.3 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217550088

ISBN - 13:9780217550086

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