Self-consciousness: Memoirs by John UpdikeSelf-consciousness: Memoirs by John Updike

Self-consciousness: Memoirs

byJohn Updike

Paperback | March 13, 2012

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John Updike’s memoirs consist of six Emersonian essays that together trace the inner shape of the life, up to the age of fifty-five, of a relatively fortunate American male. The author has attempted, his foreword states, “to treat this life, this massive datum which happens to be mine, as a specimen life, representative in its odd uniqueness of all the oddly unique lives in this world.” In the service of this metaphysical effort, he has been hair-raisingly honest, matchlessly precise, and self-effacingly humorous. He takes the reader beyond self-consciousness, and beyond self-importance, into sheer wonder at the miracle of existence.
John Updike was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania, in 1932. He graduated from Harvard College in 1954 and spent a year in Oxford, England, at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. From 1955 to 1957 he was a member of the staff of The New Yorker. His novels have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the National Book Cri...
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Title:Self-consciousness: MemoirsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:276 pages, 8.25 × 5.51 × 0.6 inPublished:March 13, 2012Publisher:Random House Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0812982967

ISBN - 13:9780812982961

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Fascinating . . . These memoirs, often unabashedly philosophical, take us inside Updike’s mind in the way that biography almost never can.”—Chicago Tribune    “Opulent . . . charming . . . [Updike’s] best writing, like Nabokov’s, is the prose of rapture.”—The New York Times Book Review   “Poignant . . . wonderfully crafted recollections . . . One completes this book wanting to convey some signal of gratitude, some affectionate reader’s embrace, to this good boy of a grown man who has striven so earnestly and masterly to describe life.”—Chicago Sun-Times