Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life

Paperback | August 1, 1998

byOwen Flanagan

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In this trailblazing collection of essays on free will and the human mind, distinguished philosopher Owen Flanagan seeks to reconcile a scientific view of ourselves with an account of ourselves as meaning makers and agents of free will. He approaches this old philosophical quagmire from newangles, bringing to it the latest insights of neuroscience, cognitive science, and psychiatry. Covering a host of topics, these essays discuss whether the conscious mind can be explained scientifically, whether dreams are self-expressive or just noise, the moral socialization of children, and thenature of psychological phenomena. Ultimately, Flanagan concludes that a naturalistic view of the self need not lead to nihilism, but rather to a liberating vision of personal identity which makes sense of agency, character transformation, and the value and worth of human life.

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From Our Editors

What makes the life of any animal, even one as sophisticated as Homo sapiens, worth anything? What place in a material world is there for God? And if there is no place for a God, then what hold can morality possibly have on us? Why isn't everything allowed? In this trailblazing collection of essays on free will and the human mind, dist...

From the Publisher

In this trailblazing collection of essays on free will and the human mind, distinguished philosopher Owen Flanagan seeks to reconcile a scientific view of ourselves with an account of ourselves as meaning makers and agents of free will. He approaches this old philosophical quagmire from newangles, bringing to it the latest insights of ...

Owen Flanagan is at Duke University.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 9.09 × 6.1 × 0.71 inPublished:August 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195126521

ISBN - 13:9780195126525

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: What Makes Life Worth Living?2. Is a Science of the Conscious Mind Possible?3. Self-Expression in Sleep: Neuroscience and Dreams4. Neuroscience, Agency, and the Meaning of Life5. Multiple Identity, Character Transformation, and Self-Reclamation6. I Remember You7. Children, Other Minds, and Honesty8. Ethics Naturalized: Ethics as Human Ecology9. Identity and Reflection10. Virtue and Ignorance11. Admirable Immorality and Admirable Imperfection12. Self-Confidence13. Epilogue: Save the Last Dance for MeIndex

From Our Editors

What makes the life of any animal, even one as sophisticated as Homo sapiens, worth anything? What place in a material world is there for God? And if there is no place for a God, then what hold can morality possibly have on us? Why isn't everything allowed? In this trailblazing collection of essays on free will and the human mind, distinguished philosopher Owen Flanagan tackles these questions and more. He pursues the old philosophical project of reconciling a scientific view of ourselves with a view of ourselves as agents of free will and meaning-makers. But he approaches this project from new angles, bringing in the latest insights of neuroscience, cognitive science, and psychiatry. Flanagan covers a host of topics of concern to every thoughtful person living in today's world. These discussions include whether the conscious mind can be explained scientifically, whether dreams are self-expressive or just noise, the moral socialization of children, and the nature of psychological phenomena such as multiple personality disorder and false memory syndrome. What emerg

Editorial Reviews

"Owen Flanagan is a highly prolific writer and speaker whose work brings together results of research in several empirical disciplines overlapping with philosophy, particularly neuroscience and other areas of psychology."--The Philosophy Review