Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other Paradigms by M. Lynne MurphySemantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other Paradigms by M. Lynne Murphy

Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other Paradigms

byM. Lynne Murphy

Paperback | July 31, 2008

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This book explores how some word meanings are paradigmatically related to each other, for example, as opposites or synonyms, and how they relate to the mental organization of our vocabularies. Traditional approaches claim that such relationships are part of our lexical knowledge (our "dictionary" of mentally stored words) but Lynne Murphy argues that lexical relationships actually constitute our "metalinguistic" knowledge. The book draws on a century of previous research, including word association experiments, child language, and the use of synonyms and antonyms in text.
Title:Semantic Relations and the Lexicon: Antonymy, Synonymy and other ParadigmsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:July 31, 2008Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521070589

ISBN - 13:9780521070584

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Symbols and typographical conventions; Part I. Paradigmatic Relations, Generally: 1. Why lexical relations?; 2. A pragmatic approach to semantic relations; 3. Other approaches; Part II. Paradigmatic Relations, Specifically: 4. Synonymy and similarity; 5. Antonymy and contrast; 6. Hyponymy, meronymy and other relations; 7. Lexicon and metalexicon: implications and explorations; Appendix: relation elements; Notes; References; Index.

Editorial Reviews

Review of the hardback: '... there can be little doubt that Semantic Relations and the Lexicon makes a very significant contribution to current thinking about lexical semantics, and that future scholarship will find the book difficult to ignore. It is hereby warmly recommended.' International Journal of Linguistics