Sense and Sensibility (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) by Jane AustenSense and Sensibility (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) by Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibility (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

byJane AustenIntroduction byLaura Engel

Mass Market Paperback | August 1, 2003

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Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:

  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
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  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
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  • All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.

    Jane Austen’s first published novel, Sense and Sensibility is a wonderfully entertaining tale of flirtation and folly that revolves around two starkly different sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. While Elinor is thoughtful, considerate, and calm, her younger sister is emotional and wildly romantic. Both are looking for a husband, but neither Elinor’s reason nor Marianne’s passion can lead them to perfect happiness—as Marianne falls for an unscrupulous rascal and Elinor becomes attached to a man who’s already engaged.   

    Startling secrets, unexpected twists, and heartless betrayals interrupt the marriage games that follow. Filled with satiric wit and subtle characterizations, Sense and Sensibility teaches that true love requires a balance of reason and emotion.

    Laura Engel received her BA from Bryn Mawr College and her MA and PhD from Columbia University. She has taught in independent schools in New York city and is now a visiting assistant professor of English at Macalester College. Her previous publications include essays on the novelists A. S. Byatt and Edna O’Brien. Her forthcoming book is a biography of three eighteenth-century British actresses.

Laura Engel received her BA from Bryn Mawr College and her MA and PhD from Columbia University. She has taught in independent schools in New York city and is now a visiting assistant professor of English at Macalester College. Her previous publications include essays on the novelists A. S. Byatt and Edna O’Brien. Her forthcoming book i...
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Title:Sense and Sensibility (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)Format:Mass Market PaperbackPublished:August 1, 2003Publisher:Barnes & Noble BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1593080492

ISBN - 13:9781593080495

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sense and Sensibility A brilliant story about sisters, romance, and societal dictates, and it’s ideal re-reading material, as you age, you appreciate these women in different ways. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-08-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from sense and sensibility Another great from the greatest writer. Loved it.
Date published: 2017-08-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great exploration. Austen explores all the possible facets of love: patient, filial, passionate, rational...
Date published: 2017-05-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best romantic literatures to read I would say that this novel will definitely change the perceptions of our sense and sensibility of romance and adventure, when it comes to reading one of the best romance novels like this one by Austen <3 <3 <3 <3
Date published: 2017-04-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Its a classic, great read!
Date published: 2017-04-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Classic! Another Jane Austen timeless classic.
Date published: 2017-02-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Book A great book! I love Austen and am so glad I finally got around to this book :)
Date published: 2017-01-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Book "Sense and Sensibility" is a wonderful classic. The characters are well-developed and dynamic, the plot interesting with many plot twists, and a good balance of humour and serious content throughout. Satire is also found in this book. Overall, to anyone who is a fan of Jane Austen and even to anyone who is not, "Sense and Sensibility" is a must-read classic.
Date published: 2017-01-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read all of Jane Austen You will never be disappointed when reading a novel by Jane Austen, she was the greatest writer of our time.
Date published: 2017-01-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read it if you have sisters This is one of my favorite Jane Austen books. I can especially relate to the dynamic between the sisters, and is a great romantic read!
Date published: 2016-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good read A great romantic novel. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-14
Rated 1 out of 5 by from no the best I love miss austen's works. But sadly to say this is not the best book I've read by her, but it is worth the read. It's a bit of a bore and is not the same slight comical lines and remarks as Emma or Pride & Prejudice.
Date published: 2013-08-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The most romantic of all Austen’s novels. The first of her published novels, Sense and Sensibility tells the story of Dashwood sister’s Elinor and Marianne who although basically penniless, are determined to move towards what they believe to be the perfect love. Marianne being thoroughly romantic and ardent in her vision is ready to die for love, but Elinor is more thoughtful and self-controlled and puts much more sense into it. They will each have to overcome grief and despair to achieve what they hope will be marital bliss. In my opinion, this first novel of Austen is by far her most romantic and depicts sisterly love in a beautiful way. Each time I read it, I can help but feeling for either of the sisters as they grow apart or closer in their quest for Edward Ferrars or John Willoughby. The whole novel is well plotted, not matter what some people have said about the unraveling of the love triangle that is Lucy Steele, Elinor and Edward. And even though every deadly romantic individual will hope for a happy ending in between Marianne and Willoughby, I find that her marrying sensible Colonel Brandon, although almost twice her senior, is much more suitable than her ending with Willoughby. For more about this book and many more, visit my blog at: ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-30
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Yawn Not the worst of the worst but a yawn... didn't get through it... too boring. It was the audio book version and listened to during the last half of a 13 and a half hour drive, so I may not be the best judge.
Date published: 2011-12-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read! Something about this story made me love it. I think it was her sister's love affair in the background. I love that it didn't shadow over the main love affair but in a way complimented it. In true Austen Style she has a quiet and responsible character and a wild and outspoken one with Gentlemen at the ready.
Date published: 2011-05-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Classic! I quite enjoyed this book and am a fan of Jane Austen. Although some may find it boring you really need to get into it and read the first few chapters so you can get a picture and understanding of the characters and you will be drawn in!
Date published: 2010-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Book Review: Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen This fantabulous classic was part of my read for the Everything Austen Challenge. Due to my love for anything and everything Victorian, I can say that it was only natural that I’d fall in love with this timeless piece. This story of the very different Dashwood sisters and their clashing tastes in their choices of men to love, was endearing as well as very frustrating at times. Just when I thought the obvious about Colonel Brandon, Edward or Willoughby- the story took a different turn just to add to the intrigue of it all; classic Austen at its best. The story revolves around love-sickness, love-triangles, a marriage of convenience, age and love, differences of choices and opinions, wealth and social status, influence, family conflict, secret-filled pasts and ultimately…and appropriately so: sense and sensibility. I’m still not sure which of the sisters I concurred with the most; Elinor or Marianne... Austen brilliantly shifts us from one perception to the other while embracing both depending on the situation. Ultimately the girls’ reconciliation and love for eachother blends the disparities of state helping them come to terms with their own serenity. Love can then be found and accepted under a new light. Sense and Sensibility is a light read embedded with deeper meaning that brings comfort, peaks interest and offers a colourful variety of figures (the comical busy-body Miss Jennings is indeed very special!) On the whole, this read meshed excitement, passion, drama as well as ‘sagesse’ in the lives of two otherwise very ordinary ladies of the times. The book doesn’t skip a beat with essential meanings and turn of events within every paragraph- With this one, you won’t want to blink:) One can never get enough of elegantly written suspense-filled love twists and pangs. At least I can't- Loved it! -
Date published: 2009-08-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Simply the best! This delightful re-covered copy of the classic was given to me as a gift and I honestly can't think of a better gift. The story of Maryanne and Elinor is one of my all-time favourites. The Dashwoods have to move after Mr Dashwoods' death (the male child inherits); they move to a cottage on the property of a relative. It is here that Marianne meets two suitors - Colonol Brandon and Mr Willowby. Elinor had met Edward Ferrars (Fanny's brother) right before the move and is not sure if he likes her. The sisters both show their love in different ways......... Truly a classic!
Date published: 2009-05-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from More Depth Having seen and loved the Ang Lee movie with Emma Thompson's screenplay, I didn't know what the book would add. As usual, though, the book gives more depth to the characters and plot, and Willoughby's actions are more understandable, although still wrong. A few other changes, like a wife and children for Sir John Middleton, but overall, an enjoyable read. The character change in Marianne, from a vivacious to sedate, is such a departure that I find it hard to believe, broken heart, or not.
Date published: 2008-05-01

Read from the Book

From Laura Engel’s Introduction to Sense and Sensibility Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen’s first published novel, tells the story of the lives, loves, and longings of two sisters, the sensitive, romantic Marianne and the practical, even-tempered Elinor. With its extended cast of supporting characters, including the garrulous Mrs. Jennings, the stern Mr. Palmer, and the censorious Mrs. Ferrars, Sense and Sensibility revolves around two narratives: the possible romances of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood and the day-to-day existence of everyone else. The constant anxiety that pervades the story stems from the possibility that the sisters may have to make do with the mundanity of country life, cluttered with gossip, clamor, and superficiality, instead of being swept away by the men of their dreams. In typical Austen fashion we are made aware from the outset that Marianne’s choice of suitor, the dashing and theatrical Willoughby, may be a disaster. Elinor’s more subdued love object, the shy and awkward Edward Ferrars, on the other hand, just might prove himself worthy if he could manage to articulate a full sentence. Austen began working on Sense and Sensibility in 1795 with an epistolary fragment entitled “Elinor and Marianne” (now lost). The final version was not published until 1811, with a second edition issued in 1813 (Austen-Leigh, Jane Austen: Her Life and Letters). Once described as “bleak, dark, and nasty” compared with the “brightness” of Pride and Prejudice or the complexity of her more mature works Emma, Mansfield Park, and Persuasion, Sense and Sensibility has recently undergone a critical renaissance. New editions, renewed scholarship, and a critically acclaimed film version have put the novel center stage. Sense and Sensibility is a coming-of-age novel, and also a work that chronicles Austen’s own “coming of age”—her development as a writer. When she began working on “Elinor and Marianne” she was only twenty, a young woman with the possibility of courtship, marriage, and family open to her. By the time the second edition of the novel was released, Austen had moved from Hampshire to Bath, lost her adoring father, been disappointed in love, rejected a marriage proposal, and relocated again with her mother and sister to Chawton, where she turned her attention to writing. Austen’s sense of herself in the world must have been influenced by her close relationship with her only sister, Cassandra, who similarly was disappointed in love and in the awkward position of elder spinster aunt to a large and noisy upper-middle-class country family. The only surviving portrait of Austen, a watercolor sketch by her sister, depicts the author as a plain, pensive subject with large eyes and a slight hint of a smile. She appears proper and subdued, unlike the description of her by a family friend, who pronounced her “certainly pretty—bright & a good deal of colour in her face—like a doll” (Tomalin, Jane Austen: A Life). Austen’s niece Anna’s view of her aunt matches Cassandra’s portrayal of her: “Her complexion [is] of that rare sort which seems the particular property of light brunettes: a mottled skin, not fair, but perfectly clear and healthy; the fine naturally curling hair, neither light nor dark; the bright hazel eyes to match the rather small, but well shaped nose” (Austen-Leigh). In keeping with Austen’s status as a respectable daughter of a clergyman, Sense and Sensibility was first published anonymously. The initial advertisement for the novel, which appeared in the Morning Chronicle on October 31, 1811, refers to the author as “A Lady.” A subsequent notice in the same paper on November 7, 1811, bills the work as “an extraordinary novel by A Lady.” A few weeks later the book was announced as “an Interesting Novel by Lady A” (Austen-Leigh, p. 254). Austen apparently made some money on the first edition. Her biographers Richard and William Austen-Leigh note that the £140 profit from the first edition of Sense and Sensibility was a considerable sum compared to the lesser proceeds her female contemporaries earned from their novels—the £30 Fanny Burney gained from sales of Evelina or the £100 Maria Edgeworth received for Castle Rackrent. Austen was influenced by the writers of her youth. She adored Samuel Richardson, read Maria Edgeworth, Sir Walter Scott, Dr. Johnson, Alexander Pope, William Cowper, Henry Fielding, and Daniel Defoe, and recited passages from Fanny Burney aloud (Gay, Jane Austen and the Theatre). In Sense and Sensibility Austen echoes earlier novelists while at the same time anticipating the format of the nineteenth-century novel. Austen’s choice of translating “Elinor and Marianne” from an epistolary narrative (a novel in letters) into a story told by a central narrator allowed her to juxtapose the internal and external facets of her heroines. What we see Elinor do is often contrasted with what we know she is thinking. This gap between thought and action is highlighted repeatedly throughout the novel.