Sense and Sensibility: Two Sisters. Two Romances. A Tragic Tale Of Love And Deceit

Sense and Sensibility: Two Sisters. Two Romances. A Tragic Tale Of Love And Deceit

Mass Market Paperback | December 15, 1995

byJane Austen

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Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title-offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of Sense and Sensibility includes a Foreword, Biographical Note, and Afterword by Elizabeth Engstrom.

Elinor Dashwood is affectionate and good-natured--but above all, prudent. She takes pride in her ability to conceal her emotions from others. Her younger sister, Marianne, on the other hand, is everything Elinor is not: impulsive, romantic, and carefree. It's hard to imagine two sisters who could be more different.

But twists of fate will unite Elinor and Marianne in a tangled web of deception that could ruin each of them.

Both have decided to marry. Elinor has made a sensible decision and has set her sights on a man she believes will be a good husband and a decent provider. Marianne--swept away by emotion--has lost her heart to a handsome, dashing charmer. Men as different as night and day: but each sister believes she has made the perfect choice.

Or has she?

Sense and Sensibility: Two Sisters. Two Romances. A Tragic Tale Of Love And Deceit

Mass Market Paperback | December 15, 1995
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From Our Editors

Elinor and Marianne Dashwood--two sisters with very different personalities--are faced with the same problem. English law prevents them from inheriting large sums of money. Therefore, their only real alternative is for each of them to find a proper suitor and marry into money. The Columbia Pictures feature film to be released in Decemb...

From the Publisher

Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title-offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and featur...

Jane Austen (16 December 1775 - 18 July 1817) was an English novelist whose realism, biting social commentary and masterful use of free indirect speech, burlesque and irony have earned her a place as one of the most widely-read and best-loved writers in British literature.

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Format:Mass Market PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 6.78 × 4.34 × 0.98 inPublished:December 15, 1995Publisher:Tom Doherty Associates

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0812543122

ISBN - 13:9780812543124

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Customer Reviews of Sense and Sensibility: Two Sisters. Two Romances. A Tragic Tale Of Love And Deceit

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Book "Sense and Sensibility" is a wonderful classic. The characters are well-developed and dynamic, the plot interesting with many plot twists, and a good balance of humour and serious content throughout. Satire is also found in this book. Overall, to anyone who is a fan of Jane Austen and even to anyone who is not, "Sense and Sensibility" is a must-read classic.
Date published: 2017-01-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read all of Jane Austen You will never be disappointed when reading a novel by Jane Austen, she was the greatest writer of our time.
Date published: 2017-01-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read it if you have sisters This is one of my favorite Jane Austen books. I can especially relate to the dynamic between the sisters, and is a great romantic read!
Date published: 2016-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good read A great romantic novel. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-14
Rated 1 out of 5 by from no the best I love miss austen's works. But sadly to say this is not the best book I've read by her, but it is worth the read. It's a bit of a bore and is not the same slight comical lines and remarks as Emma or Pride & Prejudice.
Date published: 2013-08-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The most romantic of all Austen’s novels. The first of her published novels, Sense and Sensibility tells the story of Dashwood sister’s Elinor and Marianne who although basically penniless, are determined to move towards what they believe to be the perfect love. Marianne being thoroughly romantic and ardent in her vision is ready to die for love, but Elinor is more thoughtful and self-controlled and puts much more sense into it. They will each have to overcome grief and despair to achieve what they hope will be marital bliss. In my opinion, this first novel of Austen is by far her most romantic and depicts sisterly love in a beautiful way. Each time I read it, I can help but feeling for either of the sisters as they grow apart or closer in their quest for Edward Ferrars or John Willoughby. The whole novel is well plotted, not matter what some people have said about the unraveling of the love triangle that is Lucy Steele, Elinor and Edward. And even though every deadly romantic individual will hope for a happy ending in between Marianne and Willoughby, I find that her marrying sensible Colonel Brandon, although almost twice her senior, is much more suitable than her ending with Willoughby. For more about this book and many more, visit my blog at: ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-30
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Yawn Not the worst of the worst but a yawn... didn't get through it... too boring. It was the audio book version and listened to during the last half of a 13 and a half hour drive, so I may not be the best judge.
Date published: 2011-12-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read! Something about this story made me love it. I think it was her sister's love affair in the background. I love that it didn't shadow over the main love affair but in a way complimented it. In true Austen Style she has a quiet and responsible character and a wild and outspoken one with Gentlemen at the ready.
Date published: 2011-05-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Classic! I quite enjoyed this book and am a fan of Jane Austen. Although some may find it boring you really need to get into it and read the first few chapters so you can get a picture and understanding of the characters and you will be drawn in!
Date published: 2010-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Book Review: Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen This fantabulous classic was part of my read for the Everything Austen Challenge. Due to my love for anything and everything Victorian, I can say that it was only natural that I’d fall in love with this timeless piece. This story of the very different Dashwood sisters and their clashing tastes in their choices of men to love, was endearing as well as very frustrating at times. Just when I thought the obvious about Colonel Brandon, Edward or Willoughby- the story took a different turn just to add to the intrigue of it all; classic Austen at its best. The story revolves around love-sickness, love-triangles, a marriage of convenience, age and love, differences of choices and opinions, wealth and social status, influence, family conflict, secret-filled pasts and ultimately…and appropriately so: sense and sensibility. I’m still not sure which of the sisters I concurred with the most; Elinor or Marianne... Austen brilliantly shifts us from one perception to the other while embracing both depending on the situation. Ultimately the girls’ reconciliation and love for eachother blends the disparities of state helping them come to terms with their own serenity. Love can then be found and accepted under a new light. Sense and Sensibility is a light read embedded with deeper meaning that brings comfort, peaks interest and offers a colourful variety of figures (the comical busy-body Miss Jennings is indeed very special!) On the whole, this read meshed excitement, passion, drama as well as ‘sagesse’ in the lives of two otherwise very ordinary ladies of the times. The book doesn’t skip a beat with essential meanings and turn of events within every paragraph- With this one, you won’t want to blink:) One can never get enough of elegantly written suspense-filled love twists and pangs. At least I can't- Loved it! -
Date published: 2009-08-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Simply the best! This delightful re-covered copy of the classic was given to me as a gift and I honestly can't think of a better gift. The story of Maryanne and Elinor is one of my all-time favourites. The Dashwoods have to move after Mr Dashwoods' death (the male child inherits); they move to a cottage on the property of a relative. It is here that Marianne meets two suitors - Colonol Brandon and Mr Willowby. Elinor had met Edward Ferrars (Fanny's brother) right before the move and is not sure if he likes her. The sisters both show their love in different ways......... Truly a classic!
Date published: 2009-05-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from More Depth Having seen and loved the Ang Lee movie with Emma Thompson's screenplay, I didn't know what the book would add. As usual, though, the book gives more depth to the characters and plot, and Willoughby's actions are more understandable, although still wrong. A few other changes, like a wife and children for Sir John Middleton, but overall, an enjoyable read. The character change in Marianne, from a vivacious to sedate, is such a departure that I find it hard to believe, broken heart, or not.
Date published: 2008-05-01

Extra Content

Read from the Book

Sense and SensibilityChapter 1The family of Dashwood had been long settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance. The late owner of this estate was a single man who lived to a very advanced age, and who for many years of his life had a constant companion and housekeeper in his sister. But her death, which happened ten years before his own, produced a great alteration in his home; for to supply her loss, he invited and received into his house the family of his nephew Mr. Henry Dashwood, the legal inheritor of the Norland estate, and the person to whom he intended to bequeath it. In the society of his nephew and niece, and their children, the old gentleman's days were comfortably spent. His attachment to them all increased. The constant attention of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dashwood to his wishes, which proceeded not merely from interest, but from goodness of heart, gave him every degree of solid comfort which his age could receive; and the cheerfulness of the children added a relish to his existence.By a former marriage, Mr. Henry Dashwood had one son: by his present lady, three daughters. The son, a steady respectable young man, was amply provided for by the fortune of his mother, which had been large, and half of which devolved on him on his coming of age. By his own marriage, likewise, which happened soon afterwards, he added to his wealth. To him, therefore, the succession to the Norland estate was not so really important as to hissisters; for their fortune, independent of what might arise to them from their father's inheriting that property, could be but small. Their mother had nothing, and their father only seven thousand pounds in his own disposal, for the remaining moiety of his first wife's fortune was also secured to her child, and he had only a life interest in it.The old gentleman died; his will was read, and like almost every other will gave as much disappointment as pleasure. He was neither so unjust, nor so ungrateful, as to leave his estate from his nephew; but he left it to him on such terms as destroyed half the value of the bequest. Mr. Dashwood had wished for it more for the sake of his wife and daughters than for himself or his son; but to his son and his son's son, a child of four years old, it was secured in such a way as to leave to himself no power of providing for those who were most dear to him, and who most needed a provision, by any charge on the estate, or by any sale of its valuable woods. The whole was tied up for the benefit of this child, who, in occasional visits with his father and mother at Norland, had so far gained on the affections of his uncle, by such attractions as are by no means unusual in children of two or three years old; an imperfect articulation, an earnest desire of having his own way, many cunning tricks, and a great deal of noise, as to outweigh all the value of all the attention which, for years, he had received from his niece and her daughters. He meant not to be unkind however, and as a mark of his affection for the three girls, he left them a thousand pounds apiece.Mr. Dashwood's disappointment was at first severe; but his temper was cheerful and sanguine, and he might reasonably hope to live many years, and by living economically, lay by a considerable sum from the produce of an estate already large, and capable of almost immediate improvement. But the fortune, which had been so tardy in coming, was his only one twelvemonth. He survived his uncle no longer; and ten thousand pounds, including the late legacies, was all that remained for his widow and daughters.His son was sent for, as soon as his danger was known,and to him Mr. Dashwood recommended, with all the strength and urgency which illness could command, the interest of his mother-in-law and sisters.Mr. John Dashwood had not the strong feelings of the rest of the family; but he was affected by a recommendation of such a nature at such a time, and he promised to do everything in his power to make them comfortable. His father was rendered easy by such an assurance, and Mr. John Dashwood had then leisure to consider how much there might prudently be in his power to do for them.He was not an ill-disposed young man, unless to be rather coldhearted and rather selfish to be ill disposed: but he was, in general, well respected; for he conducted himself with propriety in the discharge of his ordinary duties. Had he married a more amiable woman, he might have been made still more respectable than he was: he might even have been made amiable himself; for he was very young when he married and very fond of his wife. But Mrs. John Dashwood was a strong caricature of himself: more narrow-minded and selfish.When he gave his promise to his father, he meditated within himself to increase the fortunes of his sisters by the present of a thousand pounds apiece. He then really thought himself equal to it. The prospect of four thousand a year, in addition to his present income, besides the remaining half of his own mother's fortune, warmed his heart and made him feel capable of generosity. "Yes, he would give them three thousand pounds: it would be liberal and handsome! It would be enough to make them completely easy. Three thousand pounds! He could spare so considerable a sum with little inconvenience." He thought of it all day long and for many days successively, and he did not repent.No sooner was his father's funeral over than Mrs. John Dashwood, without sending any notice of her intention to her mother-in-law, arrived with her child and their attendants. No one could dispute her right to come; the house was her husband's from the moment of his father's decease; but the indelicacy of her conduct was so much thegreater, and to a woman in Mrs. Dashwood's situation, with only common feelings, must have been highly unpleasing; but in her mind there was a sense of honour so keen, a generosity so romantic, that any offence of the kind, by whomsoever given or received, was to her a source of immovable disgust. Mrs. John Dashwood had never been a favourite with any of her husband's family; but she had had no opportunity till the present of showing them with how little attention to the comfort of other people she could act when occasion required it.So acutely did Mrs. Dashwood feel this ungracious behaviour, and so earnestly did she despise her daughter-in-law for it that on the arrival of the latter she would have quitted the house forever, had not the entreaty of her eldest girl induced her first to reflect on the propriety of going, and her own tender love for all her three children determined her afterwards to stay, and for their sakes avoid a breach with their brother.Elinor, this eldest daughter whose advice was so effectual, possessed a strength of understanding and coolness of judgment which qualified her, though only nineteen, to be the counsellor of her mother, and enabled her frequently to counteract, to the advantage of them all, that eagerness of mind in Mrs. Dashwood which must generally have led to imprudence. She had an excellent heart; her disposition was affectionate, and her feelings were strong; but she knew how to govern them: it was a knowledge which her mother had yet to learn, and which one of her sisters had resolved never to be taught.Marianne's abilities were in many respects quite equal to Elinor's. She was sensible and clever, but eager in everything; her sorrows, her joys, could have no moderation. She was generous, amiable, interesting: she was everything but prudent. The resemblance between her and her mother was strikingly great.Elinor saw with concern the excess of her sister's sensibility, but by Mrs. Dashwood it was valued and cherished. They encouraged each other now in the violence of their affliction. The agony of grief which overpoweredthem at first was voluntarily renewed, was sought for, was created again and again. They gave themselves up wholly to their sorrow, seeking increase of wretchedness in every reflection that could afford it, and resolved against ever admitting consolation in future. Elinor, too, was deeply afflicted; but still she could struggle, she could exert herself. She could consult with her brother, could receive her sister-in-law on her arrival, and treat her with proper attention; and could strive to rouse her mother to similar exertion, and encourage her to similar forbearance.Margaret, the other sister, was a good-humoured, well-disposed girl; but as she had already imbibed a good deal of Marianne's romance, without having much of her sense, she did not at thirteen bid fair to equal her sisters at a more advanced period of life.All new material in this edition copyright © 1995 by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.

From Our Editors

Elinor and Marianne Dashwood--two sisters with very different personalities--are faced with the same problem. English law prevents them from inheriting large sums of money. Therefore, their only real alternative is for each of them to find a proper suitor and marry into money. The Columbia Pictures feature film to be released in December stars Emma Thompson and Hugh Grant. Original