Sentencing Guidelines: Exploring the English Model

Hardcover | August 21, 2013

EditorAndrew Ashworth, Julian V. Roberts

not yet rated|write a review
The politics of criminal sentencing has recently crystallised around the issue of whether and how a system of structured sentencing should inform judicial approaches to punishing criminals. Increasingly, structured sentencing guidelines are being introduce to frame judicial discretion. Thisvolume is the first to examine the experience in England and Wales in the light of international developments.This collection of essays begins with a clear and concise history of the guidelines as well as a description of how they function. Topics addressed include the effect of guidelines on judicial practice, the role of public opinion in developing sentencing guidelines, the role of the crime victim insentencing guidelines, and the use of guidelines by practicing barristers. In addition, the international dimension offers a comparative perspective: the English guidelines are explored by leading academics from the United States and New Zealand. Although there is a vast literature on sentencing guidelines across the United States, the English guidelines have attracted almost no attention from scholars. As other jurisdictions look to introduce more structure to sentencing, the English scheme offers a real alternative to current US schemes.Contributors include practicing lawyers, legal and socio-legal academics, and also scholars from several other countries including New Zealand and the United States, providing a multidisciplinary and cross-jurisdictional approach to sentencing. This book will be of interest to academics from law,sociology and criminology, legal practitioners, and indeed anyone else with an interest in sentencing, around the world.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$70.47 online
$140.95 list price (save 50%)
Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

The politics of criminal sentencing has recently crystallised around the issue of whether and how a system of structured sentencing should inform judicial approaches to punishing criminals. Increasingly, structured sentencing guidelines are being introduce to frame judicial discretion. Thisvolume is the first to examine the experience ...

Andrew Ashworth, Q.C., is Vinerian Professor of English Law, University of Oxford and a Fellow of All Souls College. He is the author of Sentencing and Criminal Justice (5th edn.,, Cambridge University Press). Other recent volumes include Principled Sentencing (3rd edn., with A. von Hirsch and J.V. Roberts) and Proportionate Sentencing...

other books by Andrew Ashworth

Sentencing and Criminal Justice
Sentencing and Criminal Justice

Kobo ebook|Aug 20 2015

$40.49 online$52.49list price(save 22%)
Positive Obligations in Criminal Law
Positive Obligations in Criminal Law

Kobo ebook|Jul 18 2014

$72.17

see all books by Andrew Ashworth
Format:HardcoverDimensions:336 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.1 inPublished:August 21, 2013Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019968457X

ISBN - 13:9780199684571

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Sentencing Guidelines: Exploring the English Model

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

1. Andrew Ashworth and Julian V. Roberts: The Origins and Structure of Sentencing Guidelines in England and Wales2. Andrew Ashworth: The Struggle for Supremacy in Sentencing3. Nicola Padfield: Exploring the Success of Sentencing Guidelines4. Barry Mitchell: Sentencing Guidelines for Murder: From Political Schedule to Principled Guidelines5. Ian Edwards: Victims, Sentencing Guidelines and the Sentencing Council6. Neil Hutton: The Definitive Guideline on Assault Offences: The Performance of Justice7. Julian V. Roberts: Sentencing Guidelines: New Findings from the Crown Court Survey8. Hannah Maslen and Julian V. Roberts: Remorse and Sentencing: An Analysis of the Sentencing Guidelines and Sentencing Practice9. Mike Hough and Amy Kirby: The Role of Public Opinion in Formulating Sentencing Guidelines10. John Cooper: Nothing Personal: The Impact of Personal Mitigation at Sentencing since Creation of the Council11. Mandeep Dhami: A 'Decision Science' Perspective on the Old and New Format Guidelines12. Kevin Reitz: Comparing Sentencing Guidelines: Do the US Systems have anything Worthwhile to offer England and Wales?13. Warren Young and Andrea King: The Origins and Evolution of Sentencing Guidelines: A Comparison of England and Wales and New Zealand14. Tom O'Malley: Living without Guidelines15. Cyrus Tata: The Struggle for Sentencing Reform: Will the English Guidelines Spread?16. Estella Baker: Sentencing Guidelines and EU Law