Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses, and the Imperial Press by Kenton StoreySettler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses, and the Imperial Press by Kenton Storey

Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses, and the…

byKenton Storey

Hardcover | April 5, 2016

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Following the Indian Rebellion of 1857, fear of Indigenous uprisings spread across the British Empire and nibbled at the edges of settler societies. Publicly admitting to this anxiety, however, would have gone counter to Victorian notions of racial superiority. This posed a distinct problem for journalists tasked with reporting on events of the day.

In this fascinating examination of British imperial communication networks, Kenton Storey compares newspaper coverage in New Zealand and on Vancouver Island during the 1850s and 1860s. Challenging the notion that there was a decline in the popularity of humanitarianism in the mid-nineteenth century, he demonstrates how the local colonial press adopted humanitarian language – hitherto used by Christian evangelists to promote Indigenous rights – to justify the expansion of settlers’ access to land, promote racial segregation, and allay fears of Indigenous violence, all while insisting on the “protection” of Indigenous peoples.

Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire offers fresh perspectives on the history of race relations in British colonies, while it deftly explores the intersections between settler anxiety, the perceived threat of Indigenous violence, and the public use of humanitarian language. By locating New Zealand and Vancouver Island within networks of imperial communication, it also illustrates how the press worked to connect distant parts of the British Empire.

Kenton Storey is a historian of the British Empire and a legal researcher working in the field of First Nations history. He has published articles in the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association, the Journal of British Studies, and contributed a chapter to New Zealand’s Empire.
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Title:Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses, and the…Format:HardcoverDimensions:312 pages, 9.25 × 6.47 × 0.92 inPublished:April 5, 2016Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0774829478

ISBN - 13:9780774829472

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Table of Contents

Introduction

1 A Short History of New Zealand and Vancouver Island

2 Violence and Eviction on Vancouver Island

3 New Zealand’s Humanitarian Extremes

4 Aboriginal Title and the Victoria Press

5 The Auckland Press at War

6 Colonial Humanitarians?

7 The Imperial Press

Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

During the 1850s and 1860s, there was considerable anxiety among British settlers over the potential for Indigenous rebellion and violence. Yet, publicly admitting to this fear would have gone counter to Victorian notions of racial superiority. In this fascinating book, Kenton Storey challenges the idea that a series of colonial crises in the mid-nineteenth century led to a decline in the popularity of humanitarianism across the British Empire. Instead, he demonstrates how colonial newspapers in New Zealand and on Vancouver Island appropriated humanitarian language as a means of justifying the expansion of settlers’ access to land, promoting racial segregation and allaying fears of potential Indigenous resistance.This book, which reveals how humanitarian discourse was used over the long term to influence colonial politics, makes a vital contribution to our understanding of colonialism, race, and imperialism. - Gordon Winder, co-editor of Trading Environments: Frontiers, Commercial Knowledge, and Environmental Transformation, 1750-1990