Sex, Technology and Public Health

Hardcover | November 27, 2008

byM. Davis

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Exploring the implications of the internet and bio-technologies for intimate and sexual life, this book discusses the concept of citizenship in relation to the extension of public health through the internet, and reveals concerns that sexually transmitted infections and HIV are associated with such technologies.

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Exploring the implications of the internet and bio-technologies for intimate and sexual life, this book discusses the concept of citizenship in relation to the extension of public health through the internet, and reveals concerns that sexually transmitted infections and HIV are associated with such technologies.

MARK DAVIS is Lecturer in Sociology in the Department of Sociology, Monash University, Australia. He has published articles and book chapters addressing the technological mediations of sexual life and public health.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.03 inPublished:November 27, 2008Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230525628

ISBN - 13:9780230525627

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Towards Technosexual Citizenship
Internet-mediated Sexual Practices
HIV Bio-technologies and Sexual Practice
Innovation and Imperative
Technosexual Visibilities
The Reshaping of Public Health
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index