Shades of Goodness: Gradability, Demandingness and the Structure of Moral Theories

Hardcover | June 15, 2009

byRob Lawlor

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It is typically thought that the demandingness problem is specifically a problem for consequentialists because of the gradable nature of consequentialist theories. Shades of Goodness argues that most moral theories have a gradable structure and, more significantly, that this is an advantage, rather than a disadvantage, for those theories.

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It is typically thought that the demandingness problem is specifically a problem for consequentialists because of the gradable nature of consequentialist theories. Shades of Goodness argues that most moral theories have a gradable structure and, more significantly, that this is an advantage, rather than a disadvantage, for those theori...

ROB LAWLOR is a research fellow at the Inter-Disciplinary Ethics Applied CETL (Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning), University of Leeds, UK.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 8.77 × 5.59 × 0.85 inPublished:June 15, 2009Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230573576

ISBN - 13:9780230573574

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Table of Contents

Introduction
PART I
Act-Consequentialism and Goodness
Act-Consequentialism and the Threshold Account
From Satisficing to Cost-Sensitive Consequentialism
The Rejection of Act-Consequentialism
Summary
PART II
Scalar Consequentialism
Summary
PART III
Ross-Style Pluralism and Gradability
Rosss Terminology
Moral Pluralism and the Threshold Account
Summary
PART IV
The Structure of Other Moral Theories
Summary
PART V
Alternatives to the Threshold Account
The Independence Account and the Indirect Account
Summary
Conclusion
Appendices
Notes
Bibliography
Index