Shakespeare and the Power of Performance: Stage and Page in the Elizabethan Theatre by Robert WeimannShakespeare and the Power of Performance: Stage and Page in the Elizabethan Theatre by Robert Weimann

Shakespeare and the Power of Performance: Stage and Page in the Elizabethan Theatre

byRobert Weimann, Douglas Bruster

Paperback | December 2, 2010

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Focusing on the practical means and media of Shakespeare's stage, this study envisions horizons for his achievement in the theatre. Bridging the gap between today's page- and stage-centred interpretations, two renowned Shakespeareans demonstrate the artful means by which Shakespeare responded to the competing claims of acting and writing in the Elizabethan era. They examine how the playwright explored issues of performance through the resonant trio of clown, fool and cross-dressed boy actor. Like this trio, his deepest and most captivating characters often attain their power through the highly performative mode of 'personation' - through playing the character as an open secret. Surveying the whole of the playwright's career in the theatre, Shakespeare and the Power of Performance offers not only compelling ways of approaching the relation of performance and print in Shakespeare's works, but also new models for understanding dramatic character itself.
Title:Shakespeare and the Power of Performance: Stage and Page in the Elizabethan TheatreFormat:PaperbackDimensions:278 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.63 inPublished:December 2, 2010Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521182832

ISBN - 13:9780521182836

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. 'Moralize two meanings' in one play: contrariety on the Tudor stage; 2. Performance, game, and representation in Richard III; 3. Mingling vice and 'worthiness' in King John; 4. Clowning: agencies between voice and pen; 5. Clowning at the frontiers of representation; 6. Cross-dressing and performance in disguise; 7. Personation and playing: 'secretly open' role-playing; 8. Character/actor: the deep matrix; 9. Character: depth, dialogue, page; 10. King Lear: representations on stage and page.

Editorial Reviews

" [Shakespeare and the Power of Performance] ties together disparate ideas with a dose of remarkable insight that makes this work engaging...a deep and thought-provoking tome for scholars everywhere."
-Ron Severdia, Playshakespeare.com