Shakespeare For Screenwriters: Timeless Writing Tips From The Master Of Drama by J. M. EvensonShakespeare For Screenwriters: Timeless Writing Tips From The Master Of Drama by J. M. Evenson

Shakespeare For Screenwriters: Timeless Writing Tips From The Master Of Drama

byJ. M. Evenson

Paperback | August 1, 2013

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Shakespeare for Screenwriters is the first book to use Shakespeare’s works to examine the fundamentals of screenwriting. The book offers insight into what makes Shakespeare’s creations so powerful by analyzing the timeless themes in his greatest works and translating them into practical writing advice. Geared to all levels of interest and experience in both Shakespeare and screenwriting, each chapter focuses on specific lessons learned through reading Shakespeare. William Shakespeare wrote the most powerful dramas in the English language. Shakespeare for Screenwriters tells you how.
J. M. Evenson received a Ph.D. in Renaissance literature from the University of Michigan and an M.F.A. from UCLA’s famed School of Theater, Film and Television. At UCLA, she was awarded the Harmony Gold Screenwriting Prize and the Women In Film Eleanor Perry Writing Award and won top honors at the UCLA Showcase Screenwriting Contest. A...
Title:Shakespeare For Screenwriters: Timeless Writing Tips From The Master Of DramaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:180 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:August 1, 2013Publisher:Michael Wiese ProductionsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1615931414

ISBN - 13:9781615931415

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Of all Shakespeare’s female characters, by far the most captivating is Lady Macbeth. Though the play is named after her husband, Macbeth, it is actually her driving ambition, not his, that plunges them into a plot to kill the king and take over the throne of Scotland. She is the one who drives the action of the play, from the multiple murders to the cover-up. Lady Macbeth is the fanatical center of this bloody play — the essence of all-consuming obsession.Audiences love obsessed characters. They are gritty, goal-oriented, indomitable — and fun to watch. Their passionate energy magnetizes everyone around them, including the audience.Exactly how does Lady Macbeth’s obsession work? How can we translate that obsession to the screen?

Table of Contents

1. INTRODUCTION: Why Shakespeare matters

2. HAMLET. “To thine own self be true”: Creating psychological depth in your characters

3. ROMEO AND JULIET. “Parting is such sweet sorrow”: Climaxes should be inevitable (but not predictable)

4. MACBETH. “Out, damned spot!”: Why we love obsessed characters

5. OTHELLO. “These words are razors to my wounded heart”: Personal tragedies are the only ones that matter

6. KING LEAR. “More than kin and less than kind”: Want to create a classic drama? Destroy a family

7. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM. “As luck would have it”: A good comedy requires at least one accident, coincidence, or twist of fate

8. THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. “The course of true love never did run smooth”: Or, nobody wants to watch a happy couple

9. HENRY V. “Some have greatness thrust upon ‘em”: Flawed heroes are the only ones worth caring about

10. JULIUS CAESAR. “The crack of doom”: Why we love some stories (even though we know what’s going to happen)

11. RICHARD III. “Action is eloquence”: Or, show me, don’t tell me

12. THE WINTER’S TALE. “Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall”: Why character arcs matter

13. ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA. “All the world’s a stage”: Setting and tone aren’t just background

14. MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. “Brevity is the soul of wit”: How to write comedy that’s actually funny

15. THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. “If you prick us, do we not bleed?”: The more your characters suffer, the better

16. LOVE’S LABOR’S LOST. “Strong reasons make strong actions”: Pacts, tricks, swaps, and other so-called cheats

17. HOW SHAKESPEARE CREATES UNFORGETTABLE HEROES: Hamlet, Henry V, Othello, and Marc Antony

18. REVERSE ENGINEERING SHAKESPEARE’S SUPERVILLIANS: Iago, Macbeth, and Richard III

19. UNPICKING THE LOCK TO THE GREATEST LOVE STORY EVER TOLD: Romeo and Juliet

20. WHY SOME STORIES STAND THE TEST OF TIME: Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear

21. ABSOLUTE GENIUS: Shakespeare’s sources of inspiration

22. CONCLUDING REMARKS: Luv u Shakespeare 4ever

23. APPENDIX: Summaries of the Great Plays