Shakespeare Survey: Volume 50, Shakespeare and Language by Stanley WellsShakespeare Survey: Volume 50, Shakespeare and Language by Stanley Wells

Shakespeare Survey: Volume 50, Shakespeare and Language

EditorStanley Wells

Hardcover | January 13, 1998

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Shakespeare Survey is a yearbook of Shakespeare studies and production. Since 1948 Survey has published the best international scholarship in English and many of its essays have become classics of Shakespeare criticism. Each volume is devoted to a theme, or play, or group of plays; each also contains a section of reviews of the previous year's textual and critical studies and of major British performances. The books are illustrated with a variety of Shakespearean images and production photographs. The current editor of Survey is Peter Holland. The first eighteen volumes were edited by Allardyce Nicoll, numbers 19-33 by Kenneth Muir and numbers 34-52 by Stanley Wells. The virtues of accessible scholarship and a keen interest in performance, from Shakespeare's time to our own, have characterised the journal from the start. For the first time, numbers 1-50 are being reissued in paperback, available separately and as a set.
Title:Shakespeare Survey: Volume 50, Shakespeare and LanguageFormat:HardcoverDimensions:312 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.83 inPublished:January 13, 1998Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052159135X

ISBN - 13:9780521591355

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations; 1. Shakespeare's language and the language of Shakespeare's time Stephen Booth; 2. 'I'll plague thee for that word': language, performance, and communicable disease Keir Elam; 3. The language of the spectator Dennis Kennedy; 4. Marlowe's Edward II: penetrating language in Shakespeare's Richard II Meredith Skura; 5. Hamlet's ear Philippa Berry; 6. Secrecy and gossip in Twelfth Night John Kerrigan; 7. Shakespeare rewriting Ovid: Olivia's interview with Viola and the Narcissus myth A. B. Taylor; 8. 'Voice Potential': language and symbolic capital in Othello Lynne Magnusson; 9. Household words: Macbeth and the failure of spectacle Lisa Hopkins; 10. Erring and straying like lost sheep: The Winter's Tale and The Comedy of Errors Brian Gibbons; 11. The 'Shakespearian gap' in French Jean-Michel Deprats; 12. Reading the early modem text Marion Trousdale; 13. Shakespeare and the metamorphosis of the pentameter Kenneth Muir; 14. Rereading illustrations of the English stage John Astington; 15. Nietzsche's Hamlet Peter Holbrook; 16. 'Strange and woonderfull syghts': The Tempest and the discourses of monstrosity Mark Thornton Burnett; 17. Shakespeare performances in England, 1996 Robert Smallwood; 18. Professional Shakespeare productions in the British Isles, January-December 1995 Niky Rathbone; 19. The year's contributions to Shakespeare studies Janette Dillon, Mark Thornton Burnett and John Jowett; Books received; Index.