Sharks Fin And Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet Sour Memoir Of Eating In China by Fuchsia DunlopSharks Fin And Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet Sour Memoir Of Eating In China by Fuchsia Dunlop

Sharks Fin And Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet Sour Memoir Of Eating In China

byFuchsia Dunlop

Paperback | August 25, 2009

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about

After fifteen years spent exploring China and its food, Fuchsia Dunlop finds herself in an English kitchen, deciding whether to eat a caterpillar she has accidentally cooked in some home-grown vegetables. How can something she has eaten readily in China seem grotesque in England? The question lingers over this “autobiographical food-and-travel classic” (Publishers Weekly).
Fuchsia Dunlop has appeared on NPR’s “All Things Considered,” “Science Friday,” and “America’s Test Kitchen Radio,” and is a regular contributor to publications including the Financial Times, Saveur, the Wall Street Journal, Lucky Peach, and The New Yorker. She trained as a chef in China and has won four James Beard Awards for her writ...
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Title:Sharks Fin And Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet Sour Memoir Of Eating In ChinaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8.3 × 5.5 × 0.8 inPublished:August 25, 2009Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393332888

ISBN - 13:9780393332889

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great read interesting look at sichuan food
Date published: 2017-07-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Cool! A great insight into Chinese food with a particular emphasis on Sichuan cuisine.
Date published: 2017-01-10

Editorial Reviews

An insightful, entertaining, scrupulously reported exploration of China’s foodways and a swashbuckling memoir…What makes it a distinguished contribution to the literature of gastronomy is its demonstration…that food is not a mere reflection of culture but a potent shaper of cultural identity. — Dawn Drzal (New York Times)

Destined, I think, to become a classic of travel writing. — Paul Levy (The Observer)