Silence, Confessions and Improperly Obtained Evidence: Silence Confessions & Improper by Peter MirfieldSilence, Confessions and Improperly Obtained Evidence: Silence Confessions & Improper by Peter Mirfield

Silence, Confessions and Improperly Obtained Evidence: Silence Confessions & Improper

byPeter MirfieldAs told byPeter Mirfield

Hardcover | February 1, 1998

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This important new book examines in some detail the law relating to confessions, unlawful evidence, and the 'right to silence' in the police station. The author also looks at the principles which lie behind this branch of the law. As well as his close examination of the English position, theauthor also looks at alternative approaches taken by Scottish, Irish, Australian, Canadian, and American legal systems. There is no other book written in English which gives such systematic treatment to this subject.

About The Author

Peter Mirfield is a University Lecturer in Law, and Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Details & Specs

Title:Silence, Confessions and Improperly Obtained Evidence: Silence Confessions & ImproperFormat:HardcoverDimensions:420 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.02 inPublished:February 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198262698

ISBN - 13:9780198262695

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Table of Contents

1: Introduction2: The Principles Behind Exclusion3: Procedural Issues and Exclusion4: Confessions -- Preliminary Issues5: Confessions -- The Exclusionary Rule6: Discretionary Exclusion of Confessions and Other Evidence -- General Principles7: Discretionary Exclusion of Confessions and other Evidence -- Specific Cases8: Confessions: Ancillary Issues under the Exclusionary Rule and Discretion9: Compelled Self-incrimination and Incriminating Silence10: Vulnerable Suspects11: The Relevance of the European Convention on Human Rights12: Alternative Approaches

Editorial Reviews

Mirfield's scholarship cannot be faulted. The book is also nicely written. The question of how far the criminal courts should admit and act on illegally or irregularly obtained evidence is one of immense practical importance, and one which causes acute difficulty in every legal system in thecivilised world. Every lawyer who is interested in it will profit by reading Mirfield's analysis./ J. R. Spencer, The Cambridge Law Journal/ 1998.