Simone De Beauvoir Writing The Self: Philosophy Becomes Autobiography

Paperback | January 1, 1999

byJo-ann Pilardi

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The development of Simone de Beauvoir's notion of self in both her philosophical and autobiographical writings is analyzed in this volume. Two ideas of the self are isolated: the existential notion of the self and the "gendered self," which she developed in The Second Sex, and which represents a major departure from existential philosophy. Beginning with a study of her early essays, the author proceeds to discuss Beauvoir's major philosophical works and her autobiographical writings where three personae emerge--the child, the woman in love, and the writer. This analysis highlights the innovative quality of Beauvoir's thought. It also shows that writing an autobiography can be a philosophically inventive enterprise and one in which Beauvoir created her most profound analysis of the self.

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The development of Simone de Beauvoir's notion of self in both her philosophical and autobiographical writings is analyzed in this volume. Two ideas of the self are isolated: the existential notion of the self and the "gendered self," which she developed in The Second Sex, and which represents a major departure from existential philoso...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:152 pages, 9.34 × 6.36 × 0.45 inPublished:January 1, 1999Publisher:Praeger PublishersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275963349

ISBN - 13:9780275963347

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"Jo-Ann Pilardi's work is a valuable addition....Pilardi's detailed philosophical analysis brings out numerous pertinent aspects of Beauvoir's works....[A] perceptive treatment of an important subject, and offers a helpful contribution both to Beauvoir studies and to other important areas."-French Review