Simply Electrifying: The Technology that Transformed the World, from Benjamin Franklin to Elon Musk by Craig R. RoachSimply Electrifying: The Technology that Transformed the World, from Benjamin Franklin to Elon Musk by Craig R. Roach

Simply Electrifying: The Technology that Transformed the World, from Benjamin Franklin to Elon Musk

byCraig R. Roach

Hardcover | July 25, 2017

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Imagine your life without the internet. Without phones. Without television. Without sprawling cities. Without the freedom to continue working and playing after the sun goes down.

Electricity is at the core of all modern life. It has transformed our society more than any other technology. Yet, no book offers a comprehensive history about this technological marvel.

Until now.

Simply Electrifying: The Technology that Transformed the World, from Benjamin Franklin to Elon Muskbrings to life the 250-year history of electricity through the stories of the men and women who used it to transform our world: Benjamin Franklin, James Watt, Michael Faraday, Samuel F.B. Morse, Thomas Edison, Samuel Insull, Albert Einstein, Rachel Carson, Elon Musk, and more. In the process, it reveals for the first time the complete, thrilling, and often-dangerous story of electricity’s historic discovery, development, and worldwide application.

Electricity plays a fundamental role not only in our everyday lives but in history’s most pivotal events, from global climate change and the push for wind- and solar-generated electricity to Japan’s nuclear accident at Fukushima and Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons.

Written by electricity expert and four-decade veteran of the industry Craig R. Roach,Simply Electrifyingmarshals, in fascinating narrative detail, the full range of factors that shaped the electricity business over time#151;science, technology, law, politics, government regulation, economics, business strategy, and culture#151;before looking forward toward the exhilarating prospects for electricity generation and use that will shape our future.
Dr. Craig Robert Roachis a nationally recognized expert on the electricity business. Over the course of his forty-year career, Dr. Roach has been vetted and accepted officially as an expert in regulatory courts and courts of law across North America. He has served in cases involving one of the biggest bankruptcies ever, a first-of-a-ki...
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Title:Simply Electrifying: The Technology that Transformed the World, from Benjamin Franklin to Elon MuskFormat:HardcoverDimensions:400 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:July 25, 2017Publisher:BenBella Books, Inc.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1944648267

ISBN - 13:9781944648268

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting but Misleading Subtitle This book’s title/subtitle really caught my attention. To me, it seemed like a sweeping account of the evolution of the science and particularly the technology that ultimately brings electricity to our homes. In the first 100 pages or so, that was certainly true as the author discusses the contributions of Benjamin Franklin, James Watt, Michael Faraday and others, culminating with Edison, Westinghouse and Tesla. But then, the author took a turn and began discussing the business/economics aspects, e.g., stocks, companies, investments, mergers, related politics, etc., etc. – topics that are mostly not very interesting to me. But eventually the author reverted back towards technology, but then back to business and back again. He also discusses the birth and evolution of the environmental movement and its effects on electricity generation. He even includes an entire chapter discussing Einstein’s five groundbreaking 1905 papers as well as a brief summary of Einstein and Infield’s book “The Evolution of Physics” – all this, I presume, to arrive at Einstein’s famous mass-energy equivalence relation. Finally, and unfortunately, the book contains no figures or pictures or diagrams of any kind. Overall, I found that the author covered a lot of ground here, but too much of it is unrelated to the book’s subtitle as I perceived it – and some of the material (the high-end business/political/economical aspects) I found rather boring. Nevertheless, I did enjoy the technical/scientific parts of the book enough, overall, to give it the above rating.
Date published: 2018-03-20