Skip Bombing in Rabaul Harbor

Hardcover | January 5, 1993

byJames T. Murphy

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Murphy was one of a very small number of volunteer pilots who, with their flight crews, started bombing at low altitudes in B-17 flying fortresses in the Southwest Pacific. The aircraft were flown at a 200-foot altitude and at 250 miles per hour at night. One-thousand pound bombs, equipped with four-to-five second fuses, were dropped from the B-17s. On March 3, 1943, the Japanese made a desperate move to re-supply their forces on New Guinea. Twenty-two cargo, transport, and war ships proceeded toward New Guinea using bad weather for cover. They were found in the Bismarck Sea. The Allied Air Forces--using skip bombing--sank all twenty-two Japanese ships. Murphy was credited with sinking nine Japanese ships during his year of combat, including one in the Bismarck Sea battle. Skip bombing became a tactic that helped the U.S. win the war in the South Pacific.

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From the Publisher

Murphy was one of a very small number of volunteer pilots who, with their flight crews, started bombing at low altitudes in B-17 flying fortresses in the Southwest Pacific. The aircraft were flown at a 200-foot altitude and at 250 miles per hour at night. One-thousand pound bombs, equipped with four-to-five second fuses, were dropped f...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:200 pagesPublished:January 5, 1993Publisher:Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275945405

ISBN - 13:9780275945404

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?Skip Bombing is 174 pages of straight-forward war stories of the type a WW-2 buff can listen to for hours. It also adds to the little-known history of the B-17 in the Pacific.?-The Huntsville Times