Slavery And Freedom: An Interpretation Of The Old South by James OakesSlavery And Freedom: An Interpretation Of The Old South by James Oakes

Slavery And Freedom: An Interpretation Of The Old South

byJames Oakes

Paperback | May 5, 1998

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This pathbreaking interpretation of the slaveholding South begins with the insight that slavery and freedom were not mutually exclusive but were intertwined in every dimension of life in the South. James Oakes traces the implications of this insight for relations between masters and slaves, slaveholders and non-slaveholders, and for the rise of a racist ideology.
James Oakes is the author of several acclaimed books on slavery and the Civil War. His history of emancipation, Freedom National, won the Lincoln Prize and was longlisted for the National Book Award. He is Distinguished Professor of History and Graduate School Humanities Professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY.
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Title:Slavery And Freedom: An Interpretation Of The Old SouthFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.66 inPublished:May 5, 1998

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393317668

ISBN - 13:9780393317664

Reviews

From Our Editors

Historian James Oakes's pathbreaking interpretation of the slaveholding South demonstrates that slavery and freedom were not mutually exclusive but were intertwined in every dimension of life in the South, influencing relations between masters and slaves, slaveholders and non-slaveholders, and resulting in the rise of a racist ideology. ". . . a solidly researched, provocative account of the Old South that will make its readers think and rethink".--NEWSDAY.

Editorial Reviews

Intriguing.... Oakes goes where few historians have gone before.... He has produced a solidly researched, provocative account of the Old South that will make its readers think and rethink. — Newsday