Small things left behind by Ella ZeltsermanSmall things left behind by Ella Zeltserman

Small things left behind

byElla Zeltserman

Paperback | August 8, 2014

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"Freedom is something my father has never known. How do I explain freedom to the ones born bent?" -from "Not Scared" Ella Zeltserman's poetry cuts both ways. The story of her flight from the USSR in 1979-of the young family she brought to Edmonton and the older one she left behind-does "explain freedom to the ones born bent," but it also explains oppression to the ones born free. Deftly modulating language, imagery, and events of past and present, comfort and tyranny, atrocity and family, home and war, Leningrad and Edmonton, she touches readers emotionally, drawing them into the journey. This authentic account of Russian-Jewish immigration to Canada during the Cold War will speak to all who have left their country or who moved far away from home.

About The Author

Ella Zeltserman is a Soviet-born poet and an active member of the Edmonton poetry community. Her poems have been published in anthologies and magazines.

Details & Specs

Title:Small things left behindFormat:PaperbackDimensions:128 pages, 9 × 5.23 × 0.4 inPublished:August 8, 2014Publisher:The university of Alberta PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1772120022

ISBN - 13:9781772120028

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"Freedom is something my father has never known. How do I explain freedom to the ones born bent?" -from "Not Scared" Ella Zeltserman's poetry cuts both ways. The story of her flight from the USSR in 1979-of the young family she brought to Edmonton and the older one she left behind-does "explain freedom to the ones born bent," but it also explains oppression to the ones born free. Deftly modulating language, imagery, and events of past and present, comfort and tyranny, atrocity and family, home and war, Leningrad and Edmonton, she touches readers emotionally, drawing them into the journey. This authentic account of Russian-Jewish immigration to Canada during the Cold War will speak to all who have left their country or who moved far away from home."That is what I would write if I were a poet." - Agnes Macklin, a Holocaust survivor and a refugee from Hungarian Revolution of 1956 - 20140901