Smyrna, September 1922: The American Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First Genocide by Lou UreneckSmyrna, September 1922: The American Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First Genocide by Lou Ureneck

Smyrna, September 1922: The American Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First Genocide

byLou Ureneck

Paperback | April 26, 2016

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In September 1922, the richest city of the Mediterranean was burned, and countless numbers of Christian refugees killed. The city was Smyrna, and the event was the final episode of the 20th Century’s first genocide — the slaughter of three million Armenians, Greeks and Assyrians of the Ottoman Empire.

The slaughter at Smyrna occurred as warships of the great powers stood by — the United States, Great Britain, France and Italy. The deaths of hundreds of thousands seemed inevitable until an American minister staged a bold rescue with the help of a courageous U.S.naval officer. Now, the forgotten story of one of the great humanitarian acts of history gets told.

Title:Smyrna, September 1922: The American Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First GenocideFormat:PaperbackDimensions:528 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 1.19 inPublished:April 26, 2016Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:006225989X

ISBN - 13:9780062259899

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Customer Reviews of Smyrna, September 1922: The American Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First Genocide

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from a difficult book This book is a reprint and was previously called "The Great Fire". It has been reprinted under this title. It is a very well researched book about a little-known genocide. This book is difficult because of content and there are an awful lot of names to keep straight. This book has taken me longer to read than I would like for no other reason than I had family that lived in that region (not Smyrna itself) and survived the great Christian purge. Besides the factual work, there are diary entries from two survivors of the genocide. A chilling read. And mankind never learns.
Date published: 2017-08-30

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Praise for Backcast: “This book is a rarity: humble in its beauty, elegant in its reflection.”