Social History: Problems, Strategies and Methods

Paperback | July 2, 1999

byMiles Fairburn

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This book critically analyzes the methodological problems encountered in the study of social history, providing a full assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of both the conventional and more innovative methods devised to resolve them. Drawing examples from some of the classic works in the discipline, Miles Fairburn examines the nature, varieties, schools and evolution of social history. Comprehensive and lucid, this is an original and accessible guide.

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This book critically analyzes the methodological problems encountered in the study of social history, providing a full assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of both the conventional and more innovative methods devised to resolve them. Drawing examples from some of the classic works in the discipline, Miles Fairburn examines the na...

Miles Fairburn is Professor of History at Canterbury University in New Zealand.

other books by Miles Fairburn

The Ideal Society and Its Enemies: The Foundations of Modern New Zealand Society, 1850 1900
The Ideal Society and Its Enemies: The Foundations of M...

Kobo ebook|Dec 1 1989

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:335 pages, 8.56 × 5.28 × 0.75 inPublished:July 2, 1999Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:031222124X

ISBN - 13:9780312221249

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Table of Contents

Introduction * The Problem of Absent Social Categories * The Problem of Generalizing from Fragmentary Evidence * Some Solutions for the Problem of Fragmentary Evidence * The Problem of Establishing Important Causes * The Problem of Establishing Similarities and Differences--of Lumping and Splitting * To Count or Not to Count? * The Problem of Socially-Constructed Evidence * The Problem of Appropriate Concepts * The Problem of Determining the Best Explanation