Social Security Reform In Transition Economies: Lessons from Kazakhstan

Hardcover | December 15, 2008

byCharles M. Becker, Grigori A. Marchenko, Sabit Khakimzhanov

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This book examines social security reform in the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan, with a focus on lessons for late reformers such as China and Russia.

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This book examines social security reform in the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan, with a focus on lessons for late reformers such as China and Russia.

Charles M. Becker is a Research Professor in the Department of Economics, Duke University.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:296 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.69 inPublished:December 15, 2008Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230607365

ISBN - 13:9780230607361

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Table of Contents

The Road to Kazakhstan's Pension and Social Reform * The Unsustainable Welfare State * The Political Economy of the Reform * Macro-Actuarial Forecasts * Kazakhstan Today: A Brief Economic History * Social Security Benefit Structure in the Reformed System * The Accumulative System after Nine Years of Reform * Legal Aspects of the Accumulation Pension System * Administering an Accumulation Pension System: Practical Issues * Actuarial Forecasts: The Reform's Distributional Consequences * Remaining Problems * Kazakhstan in Contrast with Other Reformers * Lessons for Future Reformers * Remaining Tasks