Sociology of Art: A reader by Jeremy TannerSociology of Art: A reader by Jeremy Tanner

Sociology of Art: A reader

EditorJeremy Tanner

Paperback | September 30, 2003

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Introducing the fundamental theories and debates in the sociology of art, this broad ranging book, the only edited reader of the sociology of art available, uses extracts from the core foundational and most influential contemporary writers in the field. As such it is essential reading both for students of the sociology of art, and of art history. Divided into five sections, it explores the following key themes:

* classical sociological theory and the sociology of art
* the social production of art
* the sociology of the artist
* museums and the social construction of high culture
* sociology aesthetic form and the specificity of art.

With the addition of an introductory essay that contextualizes the readings within the traditions of sociology and art history, and draws fascinating parallels between the origins and development of these two disciplines, this book opens up a productive interdisciplinary dialogue between sociology and art history as well as providing a fascinating introduction to the subject.

Jeremy Tanneris Lecturer in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology, and co-ordinator of the graduate programme in Comparative Art and Archaeology at University Collge London.
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Title:Sociology of Art: A readerFormat:PaperbackPublished:September 30, 2003Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415308836

ISBN - 13:9780415308830

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Table of Contents

1. Classical Sociological Theory and the Sociology of Art 2. The Social Production of Art 3. The Sociology of the Artist Commentary 4. Museums and the Social Construction of High Culture Commentary 5. Sociology, Aesthetic Form and the Specificity of Art