Solidarity and Schism: `The Problem of Disorder' in Durkheimian and Marxist Sociology by David LockwoodSolidarity and Schism: `The Problem of Disorder' in Durkheimian and Marxist Sociology by David Lockwood

Solidarity and Schism: `The Problem of Disorder' in Durkheimian and Marxist Sociology

byDavid Lockwood

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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This book presents a critical comparison and evaluation of the assumptions underlying explanations of social order and conflict which are to be found in the work of Durkheim and Marx, and of their most important followers. Its major theme is that, although the two bodies of theory rest onfundamentally opposed ideas of social structure and social action, both have to draw on auxiliary hypotheses which are to a high degree complementary - the residual categories of the one theory proving to be those that are analytically central to the other. This is most evident when Durkheimiantheory seeks to account for social disorder, and Marxist theory for its absence. This challenging argument is developed in detail, by reference to a wide range of empirical research, and points the way to new ways of thinking about how societies alternate between the poles of solidarity andschism.
David Lockwood is at University of Essex.
Title:Solidarity and Schism: `The Problem of Disorder' in Durkheimian and Marxist SociologyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:450 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.22 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198277172

ISBN - 13:9780198277170

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This book presents a critical comparison and evaluation of the assumptions underlying explanations of social order and conflict which are to be found in the work of Durkheim and Marx, and of their most important followers. Its major theme is that, although the two bodies of theory rest on fundamentally opposed ideas of social structure and social action, both have to draw on auxiliary hypotheses which are to a high degree complementary--the residual categories of the one theory proving to be those that are analytically central to the other. This is most evident when Durkheimian theory seeks to account for social disorder, and Marxist theory for its absence. This challenging argument is developed in detail, by reference to a wide range of empirical research, and leads to new ways of thinking about how societies alternate between the poles of solidarity and schism.

Editorial Reviews

`Lockwood's analysis is persuasive and often illuminating.'Political Studies