Something I'm Supposed to Remember by Holly KritschSomething I'm Supposed to Remember by Holly Kritsch

Something I'm Supposed to Remember

byHolly Kritsch

Paperback | April 15, 1996

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Something I'm Supposed to Remember is the first title in the Harbinger Poetry Series. This fine collection of gritty, thought-provoking works is written with the wisdom and sensitivity of a writer who knows of what she speaks. Holly Kritsch has a knack for drawing the reader "in" with such detail that one experiences the smells, visions, and textures of her words. Capturing the essence and voice of a child with accuracy and honesty, her early childhood writings stir, inspire, and awaken the child within us all. In poems drawn both from her rural Nova Scotia childhood and from her professional life, Holly Kritsch evokes with precision, directness and wit, areas of wry darkness behind the everyday.
The mother of three adult children, Holly Kritsch lives in Nepean, Ontario, where she works from her own clinic as a physiotherapist. "
Title:Something I'm Supposed to RememberFormat:PaperbackDimensions:80 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:April 15, 1996Publisher:McGill-Queen's University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0886293030

ISBN - 13:9780886293031

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Customer Reviews of Something I'm Supposed to Remember

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From Our Editors

Capturing the essence and voice of a child with accuracy and honesty, the poems in Something I'm Supposed to Remember stir, inspire and awaken the child within us all. In poems drawn from her rural Nova Scotia childhood and from her professional life, Holly Kritsch evokes with precision, directness and wit areas of wry darkness behind the everyday.

Editorial Reviews

"Holly is an immediately attractive poet, gifted with the stern voice of raw confession. Telling of harrowing blasphemies against childhood, telling of violation and irrepressible love, her poetry matters."-George Elliott Clarke