Sororophobia: Differences among Women in Literature and Culture by Helena MichieSororophobia: Differences among Women in Literature and Culture by Helena Michie

Sororophobia: Differences among Women in Literature and Culture

byHelena Michie

Hardcover | February 1, 1994

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This book looks at how differences among women have been textually represented at a variety of historical moments and in a variety of cultural contexts, including Victorian mainstream fiction, African-American mulatto novels, late twentieth-century lesbian communities, and contemporary countrymusic. Sororophobia designates the complex and shifting relations between women's attempts to identify with other women and their often simultaneous desire to establish and retain difference. Michie argues for the centrality to feminism of a paradigm that moves beyond celebrations of identity andsisterhood to a more nuanced notion of women's relations with other women which may include such uncomfortable concepts as envy, jealousy, and competition as well as more institutionalized ideas of difference such as race and class. Chapters on literature are interspersed by "inter-chapters" on thechoreography of sameness and difference among women in popular culture.
Helena Michie is at Rice University.
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Title:Sororophobia: Differences among Women in Literature and CultureFormat:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 8.54 × 5.75 × 0.91 inPublished:February 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195073878

ISBN - 13:9780195073874

Reviews

From Our Editors

This book looks at how differences among women have been textually represented at a variety of historical moments and in a variety of cultural contexts ranging from Victorian mainstream fiction to African-American mulatto novels, from late twentieth-century lesbian communities to contemporary country music. Michie uses the term "sororophobia" to describe the negotiation of sameness and difference, of identity and separation, among women of the same generation, encompassing the desire for, and at the same time, the recoil from identification with, other women. Arguing that the generic "woman" suggests a connection between women which transcends race, class, and other differences, she shows how it also translates all too easily into a master-category of gender which obscures or denies the basic differences between individual women. Exploring how the language of feminism has contributed to the confusion through a dependence on the concept of the family--in its entanglement with the figures of the sister and mother--Michie calls attention to the problematic metaphor o

Editorial Reviews

"A thoughtful meditation on the problems of female identity and difference within the family."--Victorian Studies