Soul Searching: Why Psychotherapy Must Promote Moral Responsibility by William J. DohertySoul Searching: Why Psychotherapy Must Promote Moral Responsibility by William J. Doherty

Soul Searching: Why Psychotherapy Must Promote Moral Responsibility

byWilliam J. Doherty

Paperback | March 22, 1996

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Paul, a divorced father, wants to back out of his child care arrangement and spend less time with his children.Nathan has been lying to his wife about a serious medical condition.Marsha, recently separated from her husband, cannot resist telling her children negative things about their father.What is the role of therapy in these situations? Trained to strive for neutrality and to focus strictly on the clients' needs, most therapists generally consider moral issues such as fairness, truthfulness, and obligation beyond their domain. Now, an award-winning psychologist and family therapist criticizes psychotherapy's overemphasis on individual self-interest and calls for a sense of moral responsibility in therapy.
William J. Doherty, Ph.D., is professor of Family Social Science and director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program at the University of Minnesota. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.
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Title:Soul Searching: Why Psychotherapy Must Promote Moral ResponsibilityFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 8 × 5 × 0.51 inPublished:March 22, 1996Publisher:Basic Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:046500945X

ISBN - 13:9780465009459

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent Counselling Resource Through case studies and engaging discourse this text ask therapists to consider the inclusion of morals and values in their practice.
Date published: 2017-10-06

From Our Editors

What is the role of therapy in these situations? Trained to strive for neutrality and to focus strictly on the clients' needs, most therapist generally consider moral issues such as fairness, truthfulness, and obligation beyond their domain. Now, an ward-winning psychologist and family therapist criticizes psychotherapy's overemphasis on individual self-interest and calls for a sense of moral responsibility in therapy.