Southeast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19th Century by Sarah TiffinSoutheast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19th Century by Sarah Tiffin

Southeast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19th Century

bySarah Tiffin

Hardcover | January 15, 2017

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British artists and commentators in the late 18th and early 19th century encoded the twin aspirations of progress and power in images and descriptions of Southeast Asia’s ruined Hindu and Buddhist candis, pagodas, wats and monuments. To the British eye, images of the remains of past civilisations allowed, indeed stimulated, philosophical meditations on the rise and decline of entire empires. Ruins were witnesses to the fall, humbling and disturbingly prophetic, (and so revealing more about British attitudes than they do about Southeast Asia’s cultural remains). This important study of a highly appealing but relatively neglected body of work adds multiple dimensions to the history of art and image production in Britain of the period, showing how the anxieties of empire were encoded in the genre of landscape paintings and prints.
Sarah Tiffin was formerly curator of Asian art at the Queensland Art Gallery. She is the author of Sparse Shadows, Flying Pearls: A Japanese Screen Revealed.  
Title:Southeast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19th CenturyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:340 pages, 9.25 × 7.25 × 1.2 inPublished:January 15, 2017Publisher:NUS Press Pte LtdLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9971698498

ISBN - 13:9789971698492

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Table of Contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
 
Introduction – Subjects of Novelty and Interest
 
I           Raffles’ The History of Java, its Precursors and its Peers
 
II          The Candi of Java and the Picturesque Ideal
 
III        The Barometer of Civilisation
 
IV        The Nature of Decline
 
V         The Politics of Decline
 
VI        Dissipating the Gloom of Ignorance
 
Conclusion – The Landscape of Regret
 
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index
 

Editorial Reviews

“This is a richly-detailed academic study that is filled with original art but it’s not too dense or complex to be out of reach of the casual reader.”