Speaker For the Dead: Author's Definitive Edition

by Orson Scott Card
As told by Orson Scott Card

Tom Doherty Associates | August 15, 1994 | Mass Market Paperbound

Speaker For the Dead: Author's Definitive Edition is rated 4.8125 out of 5 by 16.

In the aftermath of his terrible war, Ender Wiggin disappeared, and a powerful voice arose: The Speaker for the Dead, who told the true story of the Bugger War.

Now, long years later, a second alien race has been discovered, but again the aliens' ways are strange and frightening...again, humans die. And it is only the Speaker for the Dead, who is also Ender Wiggin the Xenocide, who has the courage to confront the mystery...and the truth.

Speaker for the Dead, the second novel in Orson Scott Card's Ender Quintet, is the winner of the 1986 Nebula Award for Best Novel and the 1987 Hugo Award for Best Novel.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 416 pages, 6.72 × 4.22 × 1.06 in

Published: August 15, 1994

Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812550757

ISBN - 13: 9780812550757

Found in: Science Fiction
Appropriate for ages: 15 - 15

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Recommended to anyone who enjoyed Enders Game I recommend this book to anyone who enjoyed Enders Game. It is a different book, in terms of plot and story, but it doesnt fail to please. I read this book very fast, finding time to read it everywhere. (Which is a sign of a great book)
Date published: 2008-03-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Sequal to an amazing book Speaker for the Dead is an amazing book. I couldn't put it down. I think it is the best out of the the three sequals in the Ender Quartet. I congratulate Orson Scott Card for this book. It really captures your heart and makes you feel for the pequinos. Thank you Mr.Card.
Date published: 2005-01-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Must Read Sci Fi Series continues Speaker for the Dead is a very different novel than Ender's Game. A whole new cast of characters are introduced but each are well thought out and are given an opportunity to make an impression on the reader. It, even more than its predecessor sets up the rest of the quartet, by introducing the pequino's. The fascinating story of that species and their interaction with the human inhabitants on the world shows that Card is much more than a SciFi wizard. Speaker for the Dead is an excellent look at the way human decisions, for better or worse, can irrevocably alter the environment in which we surround.
Date published: 2003-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Speaker for the Dead Although completely different from Enders Game, it is no less enjoyable! The storyline is thoughtful and left me craving more. The only stipulation was my own - I did not want to see Ender as an adult! For me he will always be that child warrior.
Date published: 2001-04-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Gets you to think.. Well, i don't know where an earlier reviewer got his "only compelling for those with limited philosophical bent" idea from! Must be seeing the world through his eyes only, as we all do. And that's the great thing about this book! It gives us a pretty good idea of how Mr. Card thinks. How what we usually do, is different from what we really feel. We want to fit in, we want people to say what we want to hear, we fool ourselves a lot.I even think that when it comes to answering some of the real big ethical questions..Mr.Card is even okay with saying.."I don't know, I don't have all the answers' A REAL breathe of fresh air in the Sci-Fi genre, where the prevailing attitude seems to be "Listen to what I have to say, and quit being so dumb as to think other wise." I know this review hasn't talked a lot about the plot..but that's okay, this is a theme book, and a great one. One of my top 3 or 4 ever.
Date published: 2001-02-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Nice I am only in the middle of this book but I think it is very good. I am not very old, just 14, and I think this is one of the hardest books I have ever had to read. I am doing it for a book review and I will probably give it a 10! I don't understand most of the portuguese or the "stark" but mostly it gives it's meaning after they say it.
Date published: 2000-10-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A 5 star Sequel Orson Card does it again. 3000 years after Ender Wiggins triuphm over the buggers, Orson Card throws us right back into Ender's life. A very emotional and heartfelt story. The speaker for the dead concept is absolutly magnificient in combination with Ender's character and his surroundings. Another winner.
Date published: 2000-07-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The best of the Ender Series I have not yet read Ender's Shadow, but of the 4 previous books in Ender Wiggen's saga, this is by far (empatically!) the best of the lot. I don't know if this Speaker for the Dead idea is taken or adapted from some existing ritual, but it was new to me, and I have been quite taken with it. The new alien race is a fascinating creation, and feels alien, as opposed to those creatures you encounter in Star Trek. All in all, I have to rate this in my top 5 list of all time, and I highly recommend it (read Ender's Game first, though, as I think it would be difficult to follow otherwise).
Date published: 2000-06-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastique! Speaker for the dead was not as intense as Ender's Game but it still had it's strong and captivating parts to it. I still thought the story line was really fantastic.
Date published: 2000-06-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I'm not giving 5 stars just because When I first read this book, many of my friends who have read it warned me that the few chapters were boring but I kept reading and reading and after i got to the 30th page, I began to realize that the pages were flying by. The story was very interesting and moving making a science fiction novel both action filled, and drama filled. This is one of Orson Scott Card's best, I highly recommend it.
Date published: 2000-05-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I'm not giving 5 stars just for the hell of it When I first read this book, many of my friends who have read it warned me that the few chapters were boring but I kept reading and reading and after i got to the 30th page, I began to realize that the pages were flying by. The story was very interesting and moving making a science fiction novel both action filled, and drama filled. This is one of Orson Scott Card's best, I highly recommend it.
Date published: 2000-05-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Compelling!!! I found this book strangely compelling. From the point where the piggie named rooter was killed in a ritual way, I found myself drawn into the book as if I was one of the characters. It indoctrinated me into thinking that this was an actual event, as Card depicts every detail, as if he was remembering it. I give it 5 stars!
Date published: 2000-02-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Compelling!!! I found this book strangely compelling. From the point where the piggie named rooter was killed in a ritual way, I found myself drawn into the book as if I was one of the characters. It indoctrinated me into thinking that this was an actual event, as Card depicts every detail, as if he was remembering it. I give it 5 stars!
Date published: 2000-02-29
Rated 2 out of 5 by from NOX Let me start off by saying I have read the whole saga and i thought it was pretty good, but this book was oh how can i put it?.... Pathetic. Well maybe not that bad but it was really slow and I think you have to be someone really boring to enjoy the characters how they were portrayed in this novel. After I read Xenocide, i figured out Speaker is basically one long introduction for that book so it didn't seem as bad after that. Basically though the pequeninos provided me with no interest and neither did the family until Xenocide developed them a lot more. BORING BORING BORING was what i kept thinking. And if you think the book was mind opening then congratulations, but anyone with even mild philosophical ponderings probably won't. All that said I have to re-iterate that I really enjoyed Xenocide despite its ridiculous ending. Actually I enjoyed it so much so that I have to read this novel again to make sure its really is as bad as i'm putting it. Thats my 2 cents!!!
Date published: 2000-01-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great sequel Orson Scott Card continues the story of Ender Wiggin. Totally gripping and imaginative. I will read this over and over until all the pages fall out.
Date published: 1999-12-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Gripping!!!!!!!!! I thought that this book was an excellent follow-up to Ender's Game. I really the new characters and I thought that is was a very gripping story. It is a change from Ender's Game but it is still as raw and exciting as Ender's Game.
Date published: 1999-11-25

– More About This Product –

Speaker For the Dead: Author's Definitive Edition

Speaker For the Dead: Author's Definitive Edition

by Orson Scott Card
As told by Orson Scott Card

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 416 pages, 6.72 × 4.22 × 1.06 in

Published: August 15, 1994

Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812550757

ISBN - 13: 9780812550757

Read from the Book

SPEAKER FOR THE DEAD (Chapter 1:PIPO)Since we are not yet fully comfortable with the idea that people from the next village are as human as ourselves, it is presumptuous in the extreme to suppose we could ever look at sociable, tool-making creatures who arose from other evolutionary paths and see not beasts but brothers, not rivals but fellow pilgrims journeying to the shrine of intelligence.Yet that is what I see, or yearn to see. The difference between raman and varelse is not in the creature judged, but in the creature judging. When we declare an alien species to be raman, it does not mean that they have passed a threshold of moral maturity. It means that we have.--Demosthenes, Letter to the FramlingsRooter was at once the most difficult and the most helpful of the pequeninos. He was always there whenever Pipo visited their clearing, and did his best to answer the questions Pipo was forbidden by law to come right out and ask. Pipo depended on him--too much, probably--yet though Rooter clowned and played like the irresponsible youngling that he was, he also watched, probed, tested. Pipo always had to beware of the traps that Rooter set for him.A moment ago Rooter had been shimmying up trees, gripping the bark with only the horny pads on his ankles and inside his thighs. In his hands he carried two sticks--Father Sticks, they were called--which he beat against the tree in a compelling, arhythmic pattern as he climbed.The noise brought Mandachuva out of the log house. He cal
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From the Publisher

In the aftermath of his terrible war, Ender Wiggin disappeared, and a powerful voice arose: The Speaker for the Dead, who told the true story of the Bugger War.

Now, long years later, a second alien race has been discovered, but again the aliens' ways are strange and frightening...again, humans die. And it is only the Speaker for the Dead, who is also Ender Wiggin the Xenocide, who has the courage to confront the mystery...and the truth.

Speaker for the Dead, the second novel in Orson Scott Card's Ender Quintet, is the winner of the 1986 Nebula Award for Best Novel and the 1987 Hugo Award for Best Novel.

About the Author

Orson Scott Card is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and it's many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past. Those books are organized into the Ender Quintet, the five books that chronicle the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, that follows on the novel Ender's Shadow and are set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, that tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien "Buggers".Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977 -- the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelet version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog.The novel-length version of Ender's Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin.Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers' workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University.He is the author many sf and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series "The Tales of Alvin Maker" (beginning
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From Our Editors

Now available in mass market, the revised, definitive edition of the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning classic. In this second book in the saga set 3,000 years after the terrible war, Ender Wiggin is reviled by history as the Xenocide--the destroyer of the alien Buggers. Now, Ender tells the true story of the war and seeks to stop history from repeating itself

Editorial Reviews

"A great read!" -UPI Reviews

"Less brash than Ender's Game, Speaker for the Dead may be a much better book. Don't miss it!" -Analog

"Told with compassion and keen insight, this powerful sequel to Ender's Game is highly recommended." -Library Journal

Appropriate for ages: 15 - 15