Speculators And Slaves: Masters, Traders, And Slaves In The Old South

Paperback | February 15, 1996

byMichael Tadman

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In this groundbreaking work, Michael Tadman establishes that all levels of white society in the antebellum South were deeply involved in a massive interregional trade in slaves. Using countless previously untapped manuscript sources, he documents black resilience in the face of the pervasive indifference of slaveholders toward slaves and their families. This new paperback edition of Speculators and Slaves offers a substantial new Introduction that advances a major thesis of master-slave relationships. By exploring the gulf between the slaveholders’ self-image as benevolent paternalists and their actual behavior, Tadman critiques the theories of close accommodation and paternalistic hegemony that are currently influential.

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In this groundbreaking work, Michael Tadman establishes that all levels of white society in the antebellum South were deeply involved in a massive interregional trade in slaves. Using countless previously untapped manuscript sources, he documents black resilience in the face of the pervasive indifference of slaveholders toward slaves a...

Michael Tadman is lecturer in economic and social history at the University of Liverpool.  His other published work includes a new edition of Frederic Bancroft’s 1931 classic, Slave Trading in the Old South.

other books by Michael Tadman

Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.9 inPublished:February 15, 1996Publisher:University of Wisconsin Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299118541

ISBN - 13:9780299118549

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Speculators and Slaves will become the indispensible work on the internal slave trade of the antebellum South -- its magnitude, profitability, and effects upon both slaves and masters.”
—Stanley L. Engerman, University of Rochester