Sphere Packing, Lewis Carroll, and Reversi: Martin Gardners New Mathematical Diversions by Martin GardnerSphere Packing, Lewis Carroll, and Reversi: Martin Gardners New Mathematical Diversions by Martin Gardner

Sphere Packing, Lewis Carroll, and Reversi: Martin Gardners New Mathematical Diversions

byMartin Gardner

Hardcover | July 6, 2009

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Packing spheres, Reversi, braids, polyominoes, board games, and the puzzles of Lewis Carroll. These and other mathematical diversions return to readers with updates to all the chapters, including new game variations, proofs, and other developments and discoveries. Read about Knuth's Word Ladders program and the latest developments in the digits of pi. Once again these timeless puzzles will charm readers while demonstrating principles of logic, probability, geometry, and other fields of mathematics. It's the perfect stocking stuffer for the puzzle wizard on your list.
Martin Gardner is the author of more than seventy books on a vast range of topics including "Did Adam & Eve Have Navels?", "Calculus Made Easy", &"The Annotated Alice". He lives in Hendersonville, North Carolina.
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Title:Sphere Packing, Lewis Carroll, and Reversi: Martin Gardners New Mathematical DiversionsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:298 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.67 inPublished:July 6, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521756073

ISBN - 13:9780521756075

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Table of Contents

1. The binary system; 2. Group theory and braids; 3. Eight problems; 4. The games and puzzles of Lewis Carroll; 5. Paper cutting; 6. Board games; 7. Sphere packing; 8. The transcendental number Pi; 9. Victor Eigen, mathemagician; 10. The four-color map theorem; 11. Mr. Apollinax visits New York; 12. Nine problems; 13. Polyominoes and fault-free rectangles; 14. Euler's spoilers: the discovery of an Order-10 Graeco-Latin square; 15. The ellipse; 16. The 24 color squares and the 30 color cubes; 17. H. S. M. Coxeter; 18. Bridg-it and other games; 19. Nine more problems; 20. The calculus of finite differences.

Editorial Reviews

"While Martin Gardner has always called himself "strictly a journalist," he should really be honored as one of this country's greatest cultural treasures."
The Washington Post For the full text visit: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/10/21/AR2009102103700.html