Spiderwebs and Silk: Tracing Evolution From Molecules to Genes to Phenotypes

Hardcover | November 26, 2003

byCatherine L. Craig

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This book links the molecular evolution of silk proteins to the evolution and behavioral ecology of web-spinning spiders and other arthropods. Craig's book draws together studies from biochemistry through molecular genetics, cellular physiology, ecology, and behavior to present an integratedunderstanding of an interesting biological system at the molecular and organizational levels.

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This book links the molecular evolution of silk proteins to the evolution and behavioral ecology of web-spinning spiders and other arthropods. Craig's book draws together studies from biochemistry through molecular genetics, cellular physiology, ecology, and behavior to present an integratedunderstanding of an interesting biological sy...

Catherine L. Craig is at Harvard University.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 5.98 × 9.21 × 0.79 inPublished:November 26, 2003Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195129164

ISBN - 13:9780195129168

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Table of Contents

Preface 1. Breaking down silk proteins and their evolutionary pathways 2. The comparative architecture of silks, fibrous proteins and their encoding genes in insects and spiders3. The mechanical functions of silk and their correlated structural properties4. Insect spatial vision is potential selective factor on the evolution of silk achromatic properties and web architecture5. Insect color vision is a potential selective factor on the evolution of silk chromatic properties and web design6. Insect learning capacity is a potential selective factor in the evolution of silk color and the decorative silk patterns spun by spiders7. Inter-gland competition for amino acids and the ATP costs of silk synthesis8. One-dimensional developmental system and life-long silk synthesis may preclude the evolution of high eusociality in spiders9. Conclusions and looking forwardBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

I can highly recommend the book as a comprehensive and up-to-date account of silk... The writing throughout is clear and well presented, and even though there is no glossary, an effort has been made to avoid jargon. There is a good index and the references are, on the whole,comprehensive...Overall, the book provides excellent value for money on a number of levels.