Spirits Of The Cold War: Contesting Worldviews In The Classical Age Of American Security Strategy by Ned O'gormanSpirits Of The Cold War: Contesting Worldviews In The Classical Age Of American Security Strategy by Ned O'gorman

Spirits Of The Cold War: Contesting Worldviews In The Classical Age Of American Security Strategy

byNed O'gorman

Hardcover | November 1, 2011

Pricing and Purchase Info

$69.37 online 
$77.95 list price save 11%
Earn 347 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

Ships within 1-2 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In spring of 1953, newly elected President Eisenhower sat down with his staff to discuss the state of American strategy in the cold war. America, he insisted, needed a new approach to an urgent situation. From this meeting emerged Eisenhower's teams of "bright young fellows," charged with developing competing policies, each of which would come to shape global politics. In Spirits of the Cold War, Ned O'Gorman argues that the early Cold War was a crucible not only for contesting political strategies, but also for competing conceptions of America and its place in the world. Drawing on extensive archival research and wide reading in intellectual and rhetorical histories, this comprehensive account shows cold warriors debating "worldviews" in addition to more strictly instrumental tactical aims. Spirits of the Cold War is a rigorous scholarly account of the strategic debate of the early Cold War-a cultural diagnostic of American security discourse and an examination of its origins.

Title:Spirits Of The Cold War: Contesting Worldviews In The Classical Age Of American Security StrategyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:340 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.18 inPublished:November 1, 2011Publisher:Michigan State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1611860202

ISBN - 13:9781611860207

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

National security depends on rational analysis of the realities of power, right? If it were so easy, we wouldn’t need books like Spirits of the Cold War. O’Gorman’s detailed study of four ideal types shaping American foreign policy discourse, demonstrates how decisions are difficult precisely because they always are about possible worlds. By taking foreign policy debate past the standoff between strategy and ethics, this book reminds us how political wisdom requires awareness of the limitations of one’s own language.—Robert Hariman, Northwestern University